Widespread Panic Denver 10 Sperry

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automator
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Fri Dec 24, 2010 11:38 pm

This topic is dedicated to: Widespread Panic Denver 10 Sperry

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RiotAct
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Fri Dec 24, 2010 11:39 pm

yes please
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1000steps wrote:Gift payments are like unprotected sex - always a bad idea with strangers... If you are gonna do it, do it with someone you trust absolutely.
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sidewaysscott
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Fri Dec 24, 2010 11:42 pm

RiotAct wrote:yes please
pay via paypal, use credit card,file dispute at the 20 day mark if suspicious. don't deal with noobs. don't trade with noobs. request feedback ahead of time. there are lots of good people 'round here.
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GreenMt
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Fri Dec 24, 2010 11:58 pm

I thought the half-eaten fruit was an apple, until I saw the enlarged image in the release thread.

It is clearly a pomegranate, a fruit classically related to themes of love and passion.

This is a wonderful looking poster.
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RiotAct
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Fri Dec 24, 2010 11:59 pm

GreenMt wrote:I thought the half-eaten fruit was an apple, until I saw the enlarged image in the release thread.

It is clearly a pomegranate, a fruit classically related to themes of love and passion.

This is a wonderful looking poster.
oh, awesome!!! I thought it was a Christmas ornament with a strange shape on it when I first looked at it :lol:
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1000steps wrote:Gift payments are like unprotected sex - always a bad idea with strangers... If you are gonna do it, do it with someone you trust absolutely.
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GreenMt
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:05 am

Excerpts from Wiki:

Symbolism
Ancient Greece

The wild pomegranate did not occur in the Aegean area in Neolithic times. It originated in eastern Iran and came to the Aegean world along the same cultural pathways that brought the goddess whom the Anatolians worshipped as Cybele and the Mesopotamians as Ishtar.

The myth of Persephone, the chthonic goddess of the Underworld, also prominently features the pomegranate. In one version of Greek mythology, Persephone was kidnapped by Hades and taken off to live in the underworld as his wife. Her mother, Demeter (goddess of the Harvest), went into mourning for her lost daughter and thus all green things ceased to grow. Zeus, the highest ranking of the Greek gods, could not allow the Earth to die, so he commanded Hades to return Persephone. It was the rule of the Fates that anyone who consumed food or drink in the Underworld was doomed to spend eternity there. Persephone had no food, but Hades tricked her into eating six pomegranate seeds while she was still his prisoner and so, because of this, she was condemned to spend six months in the Underworld every year. During these six months, when Persephone is sitting on the throne of the Underworld next to her husband Hades, her mother Demeter mourns and no longer gives fertility to the earth. This became an ancient Greek explanation for the seasons. Dante Gabriel Rossetti's painting Persephona depicts Persephone holding the fatal fruit. It should be noted that the number of seeds that Persephone ate varies, depending on which version of the story is told. The number of seeds she is said to have eaten ranges from three to seven, which accounts for just one barren season if it is just three or four seeds, or two barren seasons (half the year) if she ate six or seven seeds.

The pomegranate also evoked the presence of the Aegean Triple Goddess who evolved into the Olympian Hera, who is sometimes represented offering the pomegranate, as in the Polykleitos' cult image of the Argive Heraion (see below). According to Carl A. P. Ruck and Danny Staples, the chambered pomegranate is also a surrogate for the poppy's narcotic capsule, with its comparable shape and chambered interior.[48] On a Mycenaean seal illustrated in Joseph Campbell's Occidental Mythology 1964, figure 19, the seated Goddess of the double-headed axe (the labrys) offers three poppy pods in her right hand and supports her breast with her left. She embodies both aspects of the dual goddess, life-giving and death-dealing at once. The Titan Orion was represented as "marrying" Side, a name that in Boeotia means "pomegranate", thus consecrating the primal hunter to the Goddess. Other Greek dialects call the pomegranate rhoa; its possible connection with the name of the earth goddess Rhea, inexplicable in Greek, proved suggestive for the mythographer Karl Kerenyi, who suggested that the consonance might ultimately derive from a deeper, pre-Indo-European language layer.
Pomegranate — opened up

In the 6th century BC, Polykleitos took ivory and gold to sculpt the seated Argive Hera in her temple. She held a scepter in one hand and offered a pomegranate, like a 'royal orb', in the other. "About the pomegranate I must say nothing," whispered the traveller Pausanias in the 2nd century, "for its story is something of a mystery." Indeed, in the Orion story we hear that Hera cast pomegranate-Side (an ancient city in Antalya) into dim Erebus — "for daring to rival Hera's beauty", which forms the probable point of connection with the older Osiris/Isis story. Since the ancient Egyptians identified the Orion constellation in the sky as Sah the "soul of Osiris", the identification of this section of the myth seems relatively complete. Hera wears, not a wreath nor a tiara nor a diadem, but clearly the calyx of the pomegranate that has become her serrated crown. The pomegranate has a calyx shaped like a crown. In Jewish tradition it has been seen as the original "design" for the proper crown.[49] In some artistic depictions, the pomegranate is found in the hand of Mary, mother of Jesus.
Detail from Madonna of the Pomegranate by Sandro Botticelli, ca. 1487 (Uffizi Gallery, Florence).

Within the sanctuary of Hera at Foce del Sele, Magna Graecia, is a chapel devoted to the Madonna del Granato, "Our Lady of the Pomegranate", "who by virtue of her epithet and the attribute of a pomegranate must be the Christian successor of the ancient Greek goddess Hera", observes the excavator of the Heraion of Samos, Helmut Kyrieleis.[50]

In modern times the pomegranate still holds strong symbolic meanings for the Greeks. On important days in the Greek Orthodox calendar, such as the Presentation of the Virgin Mary and on Christmas Day, it is traditional to have at the dinner table "polysporia", also known by their ancient name "panspermia," in some regions of Greece. In ancient times they were offered to Demeter[citation needed] and to the other gods for fertile land, for the spirits of the dead and in honor of compassionate Dionysus. When one buys a new home, it is conventional for a house guest to bring as a first gift a pomegranate, which is placed under/near the ikonostasi (home altar) of the house, as a symbol of abundance, fertility and good luck. Pomegranates are also prominent at Greek weddings and funerals. When Greeks commemorate their dead, they make kollyva as offerings, which consist of boiled wheat, mixed with sugar and decorated with pomegranate. It is also traditional in Greece to break a pomegranate on the ground at weddings and on New Years. Pomegranate decorations for the home are very common in Greece and sold in most home goods stores.[51]
[edit] Judaism

Pomegranates were eaten in Ancient Israel. Pomegranates were one of the fruits that the scouts brought to Moses to show that the "promised land" was fertile.[52] The Book of Exodus [53] describes the me'il ("robe of the ephod") worn by the Hebrew High Priest as having pomegranates embroidered on the hem. According to the Books of Kings [54] the capitals of the two pillars (Jachin and Boaz) that stood in front of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem were engraved with pomegranates. It is said that Solomon designed his coronet based on the pomegranate's "crown" (calyx).[49]

It is traditional to eat pomegranates on Rosh Hashana because the pomegranate, with its numerous seeds, symbolizes fruitfulness. [55]Also, it is said to have 613 seeds, which corresponds with the 613 mitzvot or commandments of the Torah.

The pomegranate appears on ancient coins of Judea. When not in use, the scroll handles of Torah scrolls are sometimes covered with decorative silver globes similar in shape to "pomegranates" (rimmonim) Some Jewish scholars believe that it was the pomegranate that was the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden.[55] Pomegranates are one of the Seven Species (Hebrew: שבעת המינים, Shiv'at Ha-Minim) of fruits and grains enumerated in the Hebrew Bible (Deuteronomy 8:8) as being special products of the Land of Israel. The pomegranate is mentioned in the Bible many times, including this quote from the Songs of Solomon, "Thy lips are like a thread of scarlet, and thy speech is comely: thy temples are like a piece of a pomegranate within thy locks." (Song of Solomon 4:3). Pomegranates also symbolize the mystical experience in the Jewish mystical tradition, or kabbalah, with the typical reference being to entering the "garden of pomegranates" or pardes rimonim; this is also the title of a book by the 16th-century mystic Moses ben Jacob Cordovero.
[edit] Christianity

In the earliest incontrovertible appearance of Christ in a mosaic, a fourth-century floor mosaic from Hinton St Mary, Dorset, now in the British Museum, the bust of Christ and the chi rho are flanked by pomegranates.[56] Pomegranates continue to be a motif often found in Christian religious decoration. They are often woven into the fabric of vestments and liturgical hangings or wrought in metalwork. Pomegranates figure in many religious paintings by the likes of Sandro Botticelli and Leonardo da Vinci, often in the hands of the Virgin Mary or the infant Jesus. The fruit, broken or bursting open, is a symbol of the fullness of Jesus' suffering and resurrection.[55] In the Eastern Orthodox Church, pomegranate seeds may be used in kolyva, a dish prepared for memorial services, as a symbol of the sweetness of the heavenly kingdom. The pomegranate is sometimes referred to as the forbidden fruit of The Garden of Eden.
[edit] Islam

According to the Qur'an, pomegranates grow in the gardens of paradise (55:068).[55] The Qur'an also mentions pomegranates twice (6:99, 6:141) as examples of good things God creates.

Azerbaijan
Main article: Pomegranate Festival

Annually in October, a cultural festival is held in Goychay, Azerbaijan known as Pomegranate Festival. The festival features Azerbaijani fruit-cuisine mainly the pomegranates from Goychay. At the festival, a parade is held with traditional Azerbaijani dances and Azerbaijani music.[57]

Hinduism

In Hinduism, the pomegranate (Sanskrit: Beejpur, literally: replete with seeds) symbolizes prosperity and fertility, and is associated with both Bhoomidevi (the earth goddess) and Lord Ganesha (who is also called Bijapuraphalasakta, or the one fond of the many-seeded fruit).[58][59]

Every part of the plant (root, bark, flowers, fruit, leaves) is used for medicinal purposes in Ayurveda[citation needed].

China
This section contains Chinese text. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Chinese characters.
The pomegranate, symbol of Chinese fertility

Introduced to China during the Tang Dynasty (618-907 BCE), the pomegranate (Chinese: 石榴; pinyin: shíliu) in olden times was considered an emblem of fertility and numerous progeny. This symbolism is a pun on the Chinese character 子 (zǐ) which, as well as meaning seed also means offspring thus a fruit containing so many seeds is a sign of fecundity. Pictures of the ripe fruit with the seeds bursting forth were often hung in homes to bestow fertility and bless the dwelling with numerous offspring, an important facet of traditional Chinese culture.[60]
[edit] Other cultures

In Vietnam, the pomegranate is called thạch lựu and the pomegranate flower is the symbol of summer. The famous Vietnamese poet Nguyễn Du wrote in "The Tale of Kieu": Đầu tường lửa lựu lập lòe đơm bông. (Over the wall, the flames of pomegranate flicker in blossom.)[citation needed]

In Indonesia, the pomegranate is called delima and it is used as a metaphor bibirnya semerah delima (her lips is as red as the pomegranate).[citation needed]
[edit] Other

* The pomegranate is the symbol and heraldic device of the city of Granada in Andalusia, Spain.
* Pomegranate is one of the symbols of Armenia, representing fertility, abundance and marriage.
* It is the official logo of many cities in Turkey.
* Pomegranate juice is used for natural dyeing of non-synthetic fabrics.
* Although not native to Korea or Japan, the pomegranate is widely grown there and many cultivars have been developed. It is widely used for bonsai because of its flowers and for the unusual twisted bark that older specimens can attain.
* Balaustines, the red rose-like flowers of the pomegranate, taste bitter and may be used as an astringent in folk medicine.[61] The term "balaustine" (Latin: balaustinus) is also used for a pomegranate-red color.[62]
* In Mexico, pomegranate seeds are an essential ingredient of chiles en nogada, a favored food symbolizing the red component of the national flag.
* Kandahar is famous in Afghanistan for its high quality pomegranates.
* Pomegranate is displayed on coins from the ancient city of Side, Pamphylia.[63]
* Pomegranate is the name of a UK-based online poetry magazine for writers under thirty.
* The pomegranate fruit was an emblem in the coat of arms of Catherine of Aragon (1485–1536). She was the widow of Arthur, Prince of Wales but, more memorably, was King Henry VIII's first wife. However, when Henry and Catherine could not produce a male heir, the King eventually married Anne Boleyn. As Queen, Boleyn's first decree designated a new coat of arms, showing a white falcon pecking at a pomegranate.
* The carrack, Peter Pomegranate was named by Henry VIII after his first wife (See above) and Peter the Apostle
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GreenMt
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:16 am

Dante Gabriel Rosetti's Persephona:

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southerngarden
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:20 am

what, no nipple? :lol:

i HAVE to have this...if only to match the other two?

very very very cool chuck! 8) 8) 8)
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triporfreak
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:29 am

oh yea, i'm in.
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itsdug
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:54 am

Nice one Chuck.
no comment ®
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timc
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 12:58 am

Great job Chuck, hope on of these land in Hawaii will look great with the gold WSP!
The smallest oceans still get BIG BIG waves

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turnJBup
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 3:08 am

Thatsa nice...
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aahnutz
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 3:24 am

Dear Santa...
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twilight77
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 3:34 am

aahnutz wrote:Dear Santa...
hirschy75 wrote:And twilight you can kiss my ass.
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misterx
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Sat Dec 25, 2010 4:14 am

edition of 625.....that increases the odds relative to the other two WSP's Chucks done...
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