Reprints...how many is too many?

General art-related discussion.
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dangerboy
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 6:16 pm

that's anecdotal. you won't find that to be the rule. laws of supply and demand apply in this general conversation.

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Kramerica
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 6:55 pm

I don't think being proud of owning a rare and sought after print means you have the intention of selling it. It's probably true that those the most bent out of shape about re-prints are those who think it will affect their profits but there are certainly true collectors who just like the fact that certain prints are much harder to find than others. Not that it takes any enjoyment out of the art itself but it does take enjoyment out of the hobby/thrill of the chase.
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gonzo303
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:02 pm

Prime example, Don Stepped Outside was easily a 6-800 print, then the 2nd edition came out. Thank god cause I scored a 1st edition for $100, now the people who just a few months before the announcement of the 2nd edition got screwed because some paid 700 or more.

It drymounts not only the people who purchase high but like people have said it gives that artist a not so good name.

So far Dan and Doyle are ones that "exploit" (not disploit lol) this but many more have as well or so people say.

G, what other artists were you trying to mention in pms that you just couldn't get out?
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aldo
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:24 pm

gonzo303 wrote: the people who just a few months before the announcement of the 2nd edition got screwed because some paid 700 or more.
So what? Artists don't have any obligation to anyone who buys something in the aftermarket. Should Olly Moss have emailed the people who bought the Dark Knight open edition on eBay for $150 while it was still on sale?

As a collector you take risks all the time. As they say, that's the cost of doing business.
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charter
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:29 pm

What's the point of numbering prints in the first place if you are going to reprint them?
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charter
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:40 pm

aldo wrote: As a collector you take risks all the time. As they say, that's the cost of doing business.
The only risk the collector takes is with the after market declining. If Tim Doyle wants to destroy his own market then more power to him. That's how you alienate your collectors. That's how your decrease your own value in the market place.
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DidYouSeeMeEscaping
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:55 pm

charter wrote:
aldo wrote: As a collector you take risks all the time. As they say, that's the cost of doing business.
The only risk the collector takes is with the after market declining. If Tim Doyle wants to destroy his own market then more power to him. That's how you alienate your collectors. That's how your decrease your own value in the market place.
He alienates some collectors, but meets the demand of others. Its a trade off that benefits him and those without the print, while damaging his relationship with some of those who buy the 1st editions. In the end he ends up with more people having his art on their walls, while retaining some of the collectible value as there are only so many editions as opposed to doing an open edition.

It seems like for the most part, people at this point know which artists they should be wary of doing reprints when buying 1st editions at a premium.

Its the artists choice and I doubt the opinions of a handful of posters would do much to sway their opinion, so not much good complaining about it....

but alas it is that time of sunday between the afternoon and evening games with no football to watch so what else is there to do :pint:
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Superfro33
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 7:58 pm

DidYouSeeMeEscaping wrote: He alienates some collectors, but meets the demand of others. Its a trade off that benefits him and those without the print, while damaging his relationship with some of those who buy the 1st editions. In the end he ends up with more people having his art on their walls, while retaining some of the collectible value as there are only so many editions as opposed to doing an open edition.

It seems like for the most part, people at this point know which artists they should be wary of doing reprints when buying 1st editions at a premium.

Its the artists choice and I doubt the opinions of a handful of posters would do much to sway their opinion, so not much good complaining about it....
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tailsandfeathers
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:08 pm

I do not like reprints and I also do not like 1,234,567 different variants of prints either...but then who am I to any of these artists....a potential buyer, nothing more
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Chico
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:09 pm

charter wrote:What's the point of numbering prints in the first place if you are going to reprint them?
exactly. if an artist wants to get the art out, do an open edition...
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charter
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:09 pm

DidYouSeeMeEscaping wrote:
charter wrote:
aldo wrote: As a collector you take risks all the time. As they say, that's the cost of doing business.
The only risk the collector takes is with the after market declining. If Tim Doyle wants to destroy his own market then more power to him. That's how you alienate your collectors. That's how your decrease your own value in the market place.
He alienates some collectors, but meets the demand of others. Its a trade off that benefits him and those without the print, while damaging his relationship with some of those who buy the 1st editions. In the end he ends up with more people having his art on their walls, while retaining some of the collectible value as there are only so many editions as opposed to doing an open edition.

It seems like for the most part, people at this point know which artists they should be wary of doing reprints when buying 1st editions at a premium.

Its the artists choice and I doubt the opinions of a handful of posters would do much to sway their opinion, so not much good complaining about it....

but alas it is that time of sunday between the afternoon and evening games with no football to watch so what else is there to do :pint:
Who supports an artist long term? If doing reprints and raising edition sizes brings in new collectors, artists like Dan McCarthy would be selling out each print.

Look at Banksy...would he be where he is at today because he does reprints or huge runs? Limited and rarity drives up their own market and creates exposure. It's what drives any collecting hobby. Every hobby has those rare or very sought after items. You can bet Doyle's Change Into a Truck will never be that.

If Doyle was truly about getting his art to anybody that likes the image, he wouldn't do limited runs in the first place. He would do open editions. He sees that a print of his has pole vaulted in popularity and he prints more to sell more. That's it. That's certainly his choice but lets not make it sound like an artist is trying to be nice to the people that want their image on their wall for cheap. An artist can really do whatever they want. It's their choice.
Last edited by charter on Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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DarthHippie
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:10 pm

electrachrome wrote:basically where I'm at. I vote with my wallet and just don't buy form artists who revisit their editions. if it's stated up front like Daniel Danger did with his "Please Don't Worry...." print, I'm fine with the intent.
Image
A rare case where there STILL isn't enough reprints.... I need a few of these.
Image
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hax0n
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:20 pm

I think the argument isn't about reprinting... it's about honesty.

If certain artists would just call their work what it is from the beginning "Open Edition", I think most of the internet backlash would end.

Oh, so you want to reprint your work indefinitely? I hear the Federal Reserve is hiring. :lol:
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jojobadass
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:22 pm

huh?
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Nookbrooke
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Sun Sep 30, 2012 8:44 pm

charter wrote:What's the point of numbering prints in the first place if you are going to reprint them?
This......^ :?
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