AP editions

General art-related discussion.
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dlazarow
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:12 pm

Can someone explain them to me please?
Basically the artist gets proofs from the manufacturer and then signs and numbers them his/herself and sells them? Usually about 50 copies?
Why is this more valuable than the regular signed and numbered editions?
Is it just another sales gimick?
Thanks!
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rubberneck
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:14 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artist%27s_proof

Collectors also usually prefer final artist's proofs even when they are identical to the main edition; if nothing else the print may have been presented to a friend by the artist. Prints are generally sold as limited editions, with a print being cheaper than a drawing or painting because the artist/gallery makes more money by selling multiples. An artist's proof has special value because of its extra rarity and its possible differences from the "standard" print, factors that are often reflected in its price.
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relentlesskevin
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:15 pm

Every artist treats AP differently...
so where you got 50 may be a particular artist. Sometimes they are used to replace damaged prints
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Badbutch
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:17 pm

dlazarow wrote:Can someone explain them to me please?
Basically the artist gets proofs from the manufacturer and then signs and numbers them his/herself and sells them? Usually about 50 copies?
Why is this more valuable than the regular signed and numbered editions?
Is it just another sales gimick?
Thanks!
A certain portion of most runs goes to the artist (I think it's generally 10%, but I could be wrong). The artist then gives them a separate number and calls 'em artist proofs. To some people they're more desirable because it's a smaller run size; others couldn't give a fudge.
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TheThirdEye
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:17 pm

There's a ton of threads discussing Artist Proofs. Every artist is different as far as how many are available and whether they are numbered. The original concept of an AP is lost these days. Some artists use AP as a way to sell more copies of a numbered edition after it has sold out. People feel an AP is rare since usually the AP edition is a shorter run than the normal edition and the fact it comes straight from the artist.
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mistersmith
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:20 pm

dlazarow wrote:Can someone explain them to me please?
Traditionally they were the best of the best prints from the run, no more than 10% of the total edition. Traditionally. Today, they mean all kinds of different things to different artists.
dlazarow wrote:Basically the artist gets proofs from the manufacturer and then signs and numbers them his/herself and sells them? Usually about 50 copies?
Not necessarily. Sometimes. And the amount varies. Some artists do none, some do 10%, so do whatever they want, some have a seemingly endless supply.
dlazarow wrote:Why is this more valuable than the regular signed and numbered editions?
Traditionally, it's because the artist certified them as ideal. Today, they aren't necessarily more valuable. But there are fewer APs than there are editioned prints, so, some people like that.
dlazarow wrote:Is it just another sales gimick?
Usually. For every artist that does it in a traditional, regimented way, there are 5 or 10 that just print too many and keep selling them as APs. But, in my experience, very generally, artists tend to pay attention to where APs go. They're either given away, sold directly, etc. Speaking very generally APs have a bit more cache that regular prints -- for most artists.

Basically, the value of an AP depends on 1) your perception of an AP's intrinsic worth, colored by 2) an artist's rep as to what one of their APs really means.
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yesterday
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:23 pm

It depends on the print and the artist.

But as a general rule for myself, if there are more than 10 being sold, I consider it an Artist Edition rather than Artist Proofs.

In any event, if the word "Artist" is attached to the edition and I'm paying more, I expect it to at least be signed. But I'm a signature-shark and most people don't care about signatures from what I've seen and read.
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disdig1
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:25 pm

also a lot of the time especially when artists use a third party to sell the original run like mondo, the regular run will generally not be signed by the artist and only the A/Ps given to the artist will be signed, making them more valuable to many.
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mtarail
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Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:30 pm

TheThirdEye wrote:There's a ton of threads discussing Artist Proofs. Every artist is different as far as how many are available and whether they are numbered. The original concept of an AP is lost these days. Some artists use AP as a way to sell more copies of a numbered edition after it has sold out. People feel an AP is rare since usually the AP edition is a shorter run than the normal edition and the fact it comes straight from the artist.
This.

Some sellers here and ebay will mark up the AP print that they are selling although the only reason they got an AP was because the numbered edition that they received from the gallery/artist was damaged, so the replacement was an AP. Personally, I don't care whether the print is an AP or not. Nowadays, it seems like if an artist is giving an AP to a close friend, it's going to have some sort of cool sketch/doodle/embellishment on it and that does a lot more to individualize it than the fact that AP is written in pencil on the bottom instead of a number. (See some of the Horkey threads for examples of AP's with such cool embellishments that they can't be compared to other prints in the edition).
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Toasted1
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Sat Jul 28, 2012 10:13 pm

I have a few prints given to me as gifts marked HC or "hors de commerce" I assume this is the same as AP... Most AP's I have are doodled mostly because they come directly from the artist and therefore never hurts to ask.
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Baker
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Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:06 pm

Here is another recent thread about this topic. Some artists chime in with what they do with artist proofs etc.

http://forum.expressobeans.com/viewtopi ... tist+Proof
ironjaiden wrote: "'Weener in June' is completely sold out, thanks for the interest"
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earlgreytoast
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Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:08 pm

They should always be numbered "AP X/X."
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Celsius
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Sat Jul 28, 2012 11:22 pm

Toasted1 wrote:I have a few prints given to me as gifts marked HC or "hors de commerce" I assume this is the same as AP... Most AP's I have are doodled mostly because they come directly from the artist and therefore never hurts to ask.
HCs and APs are different. HCs are incredibly rare --- where you pretty much never see them on ebay and most forum nevers have never laid eyes on one. http://www.popgalleryorlando.com/unorth ... dermy.html
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LtDeditionart
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Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:12 pm

You may also find that A/Ps are printed first and therefore are the first of that image printed before the run.
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mistersmith
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Sun Jul 29, 2012 1:37 pm

Celsius wrote:
Toasted1 wrote:I have a few prints given to me as gifts marked HC or "hors de commerce" I assume this is the same as AP... Most AP's I have are doodled mostly because they come directly from the artist and therefore never hurts to ask.
HCs and APs are different. HCs are incredibly rare --- where you pretty much never see them on ebay and most forum nevers have never laid eyes on one. http://www.popgalleryorlando.com/unorth ... dermy.html
In the modern era, HC prints are effing bullshit. It's funny you posted a link to a Seuss page: they make the crap out of HCs and try to tell the public they're worth more money. In this instance, they are not, they're nonsense extras. There's an editioned run, however many APs and PPs they pull out of their ass, and then a big ol' pile of HCs to squeeze a few more bucks out of people.

In the old days, these weren't even sold, and there was usually just one. The rough functional translation is "example of what you could buy," or, vendor sample. It's like the one shiny set of encyclopedias the traveling salesman would keep in the back of his Chrysler -- a sample, to try and convince people to buy.
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