Best way to get started?

General art-related discussion.
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ioioos
Art Connoisseur
Posts: 185
Joined: Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:38 am
Location: Cambridgeshire

Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:24 am

These would be my golden rules......

1. Love the print you buy - Never buy for investement, you could get burned as much as making a ton. Don't buy it because its "cool", buy it because you keep looking at it on screen and find yourself facinated by it.

2. Don't believe the hype - Art is personal. Tyler Stout may be great in many eyes, but not yours. If so, don't chase someone elses desire.

3. Don't worry about sets and collections - That leads to cost and heartache. If a print is good enough, it will look good on its own.

4. There is always another good print around the corner - Miss out one you want? Don't worry. There will soon be another.

5. Don't let your love of a band/film/artist blind you into buying a print you would not normally get.
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s_k_y
Art Expert
Posts: 2837
Joined: Thu Jun 24, 2004 12:00 am

Wed Oct 12, 2011 11:43 am

Try and develop an eye for great art.

Then the only thing left to do is trust it.
Browse my collection: http://www.lifeonwalls.net/store
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robertozanzi
Art Connoisseur
Posts: 699
Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 2:09 pm
Location: Miami Beach

Wed Oct 12, 2011 3:01 pm

Buy what you are going to frame and hang or give as gifts.
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ackirkpatrick
Art Expert
Posts: 2154
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:55 pm
Location: Northern Indiana

Tue Oct 18, 2011 9:38 am

Thank you for the advice. I received my first prints in the mail yesterday alot like Christmas for adults unwrapping that tube! AND I'm hooked and shopping for more.

What do you look for in a print? Why do you buy what you do?
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mattlew69
Art Expert
Posts: 7969
Joined: Thu Sep 13, 2007 5:03 pm
Location: Midwest

Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:04 am

ackirkpatrick wrote:What do you look for in a print? Why do you buy what you do?
Size is important for me. Anything under 18x24 is pretty reasonable to have professionally framed and matted. I also like prints that are exactly 18x24, that way i can buy the pre-made frames from Hobby Lobby or Michaels and interchange prints anytime i feel like changing up the artwork in the house.

I have purchased and framed large or odd sized prints, but the extra cost and hassle drives me away. Plus, i am running out of wall space. :P

The main reason I buy what I do, is for the simple love of art. :heart:
Image
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rubberneck
Art God
Posts: 25531
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:19 pm
Location: Houston, TX

Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:12 am

wyatt wrote:Buy direct from the artist whenever possible. Short of gigposters from shows I attended, prints I purchased directly from the artist are the most important to me. Especially with the newer/smaller/lesser known artists who can really make it a personal experience with extra stuff/convos/thank you notes/etc.
This.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=515-EfhXne0


"rara charta, gravi negotio"
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treweman
Art Expert
Posts: 7058
Joined: Sat Dec 25, 2010 5:53 pm
Location: upstate new york

Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:33 am

As always, terrific advice from other members. I might add:

1. Expect that your tastes and appreciation of certain artists and prints will change over time, particularly as you learn more and gain experience.

2. Many of us cut our teeth on art prints and gig posters, but eventually gravitate to original paintings and sketches as the objects of our desire.

3. Diversity can add to a collection. 10 prints by Daniel Danger, Jeremy Geddes, or any single artist gets a little boring. Unless you have a completion hangup or a lot of money, pick and choose what you add to your collection.

4. Unless you intend to DIY, framing can be very expensive. Always keep this in mind.

5. When you are attacked or ridiculed on EB, ignore it and move on. Do not feel the need to change attitudes or correct behavior. Thick skin is a must, and an understanding that art is personal.
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ackirkpatrick
Art Expert
Posts: 2154
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 7:55 pm
Location: Northern Indiana

Tue Oct 18, 2011 10:56 am

treweman wrote:As always, terrific advice from other members. I might add:

1. Expect that your tastes and appreciation of certain artists and prints will change over time, particularly as you learn more and gain experience.

2. Many of us cut our teeth on art prints and gig posters, but eventually gravitate to original paintings and sketches as the objects of our desire.

3. Diversity can add to a collection. 10 prints by Daniel Danger, Jeremy Geddes, or any single artist gets a little boring. Unless you have a completion hangup or a lot of money, pick and choose what you add to your collection.

4. Unless you intend to DIY, framing can be very expensive. Always keep this in mind.

5. When you are attacked or ridiculed on EB, ignore it and move on. Do not feel the need to change attitudes or correct behavior. Thick skin is a must, and an understanding that art is personal.
#5 makes me laugh, reminds me of the comic book guy on the simpsons. I get the feeling their are quite a few here! I've also ran across some very helpful individuals as well.
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rubberneck
Art God
Posts: 25531
Joined: Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:19 pm
Location: Houston, TX

Tue Oct 18, 2011 11:07 am

treweman wrote:As always, terrific advice from other members. I might add:

1. Expect that your tastes and appreciation of certain artists and prints will change over time, particularly as you learn more and gain experience.

2. Many of us cut our teeth on art prints and gig posters, but eventually gravitate to original paintings and sketches as the objects of our desire.

3. Diversity can add to a collection. 10 prints by Daniel Danger, Jeremy Geddes, or any single artist gets a little boring. Unless you have a completion hangup or a lot of money, pick and choose what you add to your collection.

4. Unless you intend to DIY, framing can be very expensive. Always keep this in mind.

5. When you are attacked or ridiculed on EB, ignore it and move on. Do not feel the need to change attitudes or correct behavior. Thick skin is a must, and an understanding that art is personal.
Excuse me!...you can never have enough Geddes. I shall now be applying your rule #5 8)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=515-EfhXne0


"rara charta, gravi negotio"
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treweman
Art Expert
Posts: 7058
Joined: Sat Dec 25, 2010 5:53 pm
Location: upstate new york

Tue Oct 18, 2011 11:52 am

Yeah ... I'm paring my Geddes collection down to the few that I most enjoy. Hell, I'm actually trying to downsize my entire art collection. Of course its hard, because i become attached to art that I own. There is actually some research about this phenomenon (that we value what we have more than things we don't have) that is worth remembering. It appeared in a book written by economist Robert Reich. To summarize the findings, compared to what we are willing to spend to acquire things, we demand twice as much money to give the same things up.
I've also run across some very helpful individuals as well.
My experience is that most EB members are very generous with their time. It is also the case that biting sarcasm is a high art on the Forum. All in good fun, mind you. :wink:
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Xander
Art Expert
Posts: 3692
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 10:01 pm

Tue Oct 18, 2011 12:16 pm

Stay away from eBay unless you're made of money.
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MegaTomG
Art Enthusiast
Posts: 89
Joined: Sat Apr 30, 2011 5:57 pm
Location: UK

Tue Oct 18, 2011 1:59 pm

Xander wrote:Stay away from eBay unless you're made of money.
Largely true, but don't let ebay prices get in the way of something you must own. Sometimes ebay is a necessary evil :twisted:

It was Olly Moss's Evil Dead that got me in to this game and I bought that off ebay, I don't regret the price I paid for a single second.
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