Framing Help/Advice Thread

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.
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JBFrame
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Thu Oct 09, 2014 5:57 pm

leary411 wrote:Quick question...what are people's thoughts on reframing art purchased directly thru a gallery? Meaning the art you purchased comes framed. Should you leave it be because that is how the artist intended it to be displayed or is it okay to upgrade to something a little more with your taste? At the end of the day I'm gonna be the one looking at it and enjoying it right 8) just don't really want to mess with any investment aspect of it.
Absolutely frame it for your personal taste. You are the one that has to enjoy it and if it isn't done to your taste you will not get 100% satisfaction from the piece of art.

Many artist, and in some instances most artist, are starving artist and are framing for price, and will not frame to meet conservation standards or for the ascetics. Don't get me wrong, there are a few artist that frame for the art and do everything right but even if they do it may still not be your personal taste and you will not appreciate the art fully until you give it your personal touch. Also, some artist frame art because of the requirements of a show - black frame and white mat is what most juried shows around here require. Again this is usually low end framing that is in many instances only meant to be temporary.

Galleries are a different story. Some Galleries have a certain appeal that they strive for so they may have a standard and that standard doesn't appeal to your taste. Some Galleries may have a main artist that they showcase and do not want a secondary artist to out show that main artist. In that situations their appearance policy may not be ascetically pleasing to you and/or may not capture the art the way framing is meant to. If the Gallery did the framing they are framing for price and may not be framing by conservation standards or your standards.

I would strongly suggest that if you purchase a piece of art from a Gallery or from an artist and even if the framing is or is not ascetically pleasing to you, still bring the framed art to a reputable custom framer, again I will emphasize reputable, to be sure the framing has been done correctly. It may be just fine but it is much better to be safe than sorry.

Just my $0.02 Joe
FlammableD
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:24 am

I've got my living room cleared out, and I'm looking to finally frame and hang the prints I have. I know absolutely nothing about framing, but I've built up the following shopping list on ezeframe.co.uk
Image
Is there anything I'm missing, and is framing myself with these supplies something I can do with no prior experience? Am I better off trying to find a framer? I'm hesitant as I imagine it will jack up the price ALOT.

Also, feel free to criticise my frame mockups (again, I have no experience!) : https://imgur.com/a/COYPe
simonldt
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 3:15 pm

You don't want anti-reflective glass or acrylic when spacing the art away from the glass. Can't remember the reason why but I'm sure it had something to do with clarity.

Change that to normal UV plexiglas.

I also wouldn't advise any kind of tape or adhesive. I use V-mount strips from Secol (these here: https://www.timecare.co.uk/timecare/pro ... t=8&page=1). Those stick to the mount or backing board and then the art sits inside the flap, with no adhesive touching the art itself.

It's very easy to frame. Just make sure you have a nice space to work with. Clean both sides of the acrylic with mildly warm soapy water, cleanse and then wipe dry with a lint free cloth. It's important to do this because otherwise the acrylic naturally has static and will attract all kinds of dust. Then, just fit everything together. Mount, then print, backing board, MDF back and then close the pins and finally tape all edges with kraft tape to seal the frame. I attach the mount strips to the backing board myself, after marking where the print will sit.
FlammableD
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 3:37 pm

simonldt wrote:You don't want anti-reflective glass or acrylic when spacing the art away from the glass. Can't remember the reason why but I'm sure it had something to do with clarity.

Change that to normal UV plexiglas.

I also wouldn't advise any kind of tape or adhesive. I use V-mount strips from Secol (these here: https://www.timecare.co.uk/timecare/pro ... t=8&page=1). Those stick to the mount or backing board and then the art sits inside the flap, with no adhesive touching the art itself.

It's very easy to frame. Just make sure you have a nice space to work with. Clean both sides of the acrylic with mildly warm soapy water, cleanse and then wipe dry with a lint free cloth. It's important to do this because otherwise the acrylic naturally has static and will attract all kinds of dust. Then, just fit everything together. Mount, then print, backing board, MDF back and then close the pins and finally tape all edges with kraft tape to seal the frame. I attach the mount strips to the backing board myself, after marking where the print will sit.
Thanks for the pointers. Makes it sound a lot less daunting :P I assume it's something like 4 strips per print, or would you want them the whole way round?
simonldt
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:11 pm

The strips can be cut (They're about 15-20cm long). It depends on the size of the print, but you won't need strips all the way around. For my 18x24 prints I used a strip on all 4 sides, each piece around 2 inches long.
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FramerDave
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:49 pm

simonldt wrote:You don't want anti-reflective glass or acrylic when spacing the art away from the glass. Can't remember the reason why but I'm sure it had something to do with clarity.

Change that to normal UV plexiglas.
Pardon the pun, but I think we need to clarify this a bit. When you're talking about reducing glare you have two options: etched glass (also known as non-glare or reflection control) and anti-reflective, most commonly known in the form of Museum Glass.

Etched glass has a rough surface created by either acid etching or an applied film. It's your grandmother's stuff and it will definitely make the art look fuzzy if it's more than one or two mats away from the art. Triple mat? Forget it.

Anti-reflective glass has a coating on it like you find on camera or eyeglass lenses. It reduces reflections by means of a metallic oxide coating that creates destructive interference of light waves. With it there is no limit as to how far away you could have it from the art; it could be in a frame six inches deep and it would still look awesome.
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FramerDave
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 5:50 pm

simonldt wrote:The strips can be cut (They're about 15-20cm long). It depends on the size of the print, but you won't need strips all the way around. For my 18x24 prints I used a strip on all 4 sides, each piece around 2 inches long.

You really should use more, at least two on each side.
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KSUvet
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 6:16 pm

I don't think it would be as good to use mdf for a backing from a conservation standpoint. It may be ok since it looks like you have another board for mounting, but FramerDave will be the one to ask.
"I see dudes using cotton gloves on prints that I know were printed while someone was drinking a beer or eating Cheetos, while water leaked from the ceiling. And I'm not even talking about my shop!" - alexfugazi
simonldt
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 6:45 pm

FramerDave wrote:
simonldt wrote:You don't want anti-reflective glass or acrylic when spacing the art away from the glass. Can't remember the reason why but I'm sure it had something to do with clarity.

Change that to normal UV plexiglas.
Pardon the pun, but I think we need to clarify this a bit. When you're talking about reducing glare you have two options: etched glass (also known as non-glare or reflection control) and anti-reflective, most commonly known in the form of Museum Glass.

Etched glass has a rough surface created by either acid etching or an applied film. It's your grandmother's stuff and it will definitely make the art look fuzzy if it's more than one or two mats away from the art. Triple mat? Forget it.

Anti-reflective glass has a coating on it like you find on camera or eyeglass lenses. It reduces reflections by means of a metallic oxide coating that creates destructive interference of light waves. With it there is no limit as to how far away you could have it from the art; it could be in a frame six inches deep and it would still look awesome.
What about acrylic? I know when I was researching about DIY framing, I remember staying well clear of anti-reflective acrylic.
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peacedog
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 7:31 pm

simonldt wrote:
FramerDave wrote:
simonldt wrote:You don't want anti-reflective glass or acrylic when spacing the art away from the glass. Can't remember the reason why but I'm sure it had something to do with clarity.

Change that to normal UV plexiglas.
Pardon the pun, but I think we need to clarify this a bit. When you're talking about reducing glare you have two options: etched glass (also known as non-glare or reflection control) and anti-reflective, most commonly known in the form of Museum Glass.

Etched glass has a rough surface created by either acid etching or an applied film. It's your grandmother's stuff and it will definitely make the art look fuzzy if it's more than one or two mats away from the art. Triple mat? Forget it.

Anti-reflective glass has a coating on it like you find on camera or eyeglass lenses. It reduces reflections by means of a metallic oxide coating that creates destructive interference of light waves. With it there is no limit as to how far away you could have it from the art; it could be in a frame six inches deep and it would still look awesome.
What about acrylic? I know when I was researching about DIY framing, I remember staying well clear of anti-reflective acrylic.
Anti-reflective acrylic is TruVue Optium. Scratch resistant, anti-static, 99%UV, anti-reflective. Super nice stuff, super expensive.

Avoid non-glare products.
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FramerDave
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 7:32 pm

KSUvet wrote:I don't think it would be as good to use mdf for a backing from a conservation standpoint. It may be ok since it looks like you have another board for mounting, but FramerDave will be the one to ask.
MDF in framing? It's garbage. Trash. Crap. Shitty stuff that has no place anywhere near a piece of artwork.

Unless you're in the UK of course. There MDF is the bomb and you will get thrown out of framer's discussion boards for suggesting otherwise.

But it's garbage.
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FramerDave
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 7:34 pm

simonldt wrote:
FramerDave wrote:
simonldt wrote:You don't want anti-reflective glass or acrylic when spacing the art away from the glass. Can't remember the reason why but I'm sure it had something to do with clarity.

Change that to normal UV plexiglas.
Pardon the pun, but I think we need to clarify this a bit. When you're talking about reducing glare you have two options: etched glass (also known as non-glare or reflection control) and anti-reflective, most commonly known in the form of Museum Glass.

Etched glass has a rough surface created by either acid etching or an applied film. It's your grandmother's stuff and it will definitely make the art look fuzzy if it's more than one or two mats away from the art. Triple mat? Forget it.

Anti-reflective glass has a coating on it like you find on camera or eyeglass lenses. It reduces reflections by means of a metallic oxide coating that creates destructive interference of light waves. With it there is no limit as to how far away you could have it from the art; it could be in a frame six inches deep and it would still look awesome.
What about acrylic? I know when I was researching about DIY framing, I remember staying well clear of anti-reflective acrylic.
As Peace Dog just pointed out you need to make a distinction between etched non-glare products and coated anti-reflective. All of the options available in glass are available in acrylic.
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peacedog
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Tue Oct 14, 2014 8:06 pm

FramerDave wrote:
KSUvet wrote:I don't think it would be as good to use mdf for a backing from a conservation standpoint. It may be ok since it looks like you have another board for mounting, but FramerDave will be the one to ask.
MDF in framing? It's garbage. Trash. Crap. Shitty stuff that has no place anywhere near a piece of artwork.

Unless you're in the UK of course. There MDF is the bomb and you will get thrown out of framer's discussion boards for suggesting otherwise.

But it's garbage.
:rolling: Something you'd like to talk to us about, Dave?
FlammableD
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Wed Oct 15, 2014 7:41 am

So I've switched the glazing to their Clear Acrylic Glazing. Despite Dave's strong MDF objections, it should be ok with the separate board?
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peacedog
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Wed Oct 15, 2014 10:24 am

FlammableD wrote:Despite Dave's strong MDF objections, it should be ok with the separate board?
No.
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