Framing Help/Advice Thread

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.
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JBFrame
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:57 pm

PLUSH wrote:Not really a framing issue, more a cutting issue. I am looking for a cutter, to cut things like foamcore, cardboard (things along those lines). size 32 x 40.


I What other choice besides these.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/fletc ... ne-cutter/

this seems a way better price for what does what I need - just straight cuts.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004V8 ... S1XU3CI9F8

Any suggestions on the best for my needs?
Both works but the mat cutter on Amazon is for the hobbyist and if you are going to cut a lot I wouldn't suggest that machine. If you are going to do a lot of cutting I would recommend checking out the Logan Simplicity which is still a hobbyist machine but capable of cutting a thicker foam core or mat board and is a little sturdier built. The straight line cutter on Blick is just that - it will cut at 90 degrees only. The cutter on Amazon is actually Logan's low end mat cutter and it will cut 90 degrees, 45 degrees, and I believe glass. You have to purchase the 90 degree and glass cutting head seperately. I believe the 45 degree head comes with the machine. Blick use to carry the same Logan mat cutter and I think it was at even a better price - especially when they have their sales going on. You can always find it on ebay for a pretty good price.
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Tazgarde
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 1:03 pm

The 450 comes with both heads (45 & 90). The glass cutter is extra. The straight cutter has two height settings for mats and foamcore.
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milligan
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 5:54 pm

I've been using the Logan 450 (40in model.) It is fine for home framing. The measurements are off, so you need to measure using a ruler or tape measurer. You also have to adjust the start and stop mark manually when you first get it because it is not calibrated from the factory, so be sure to have spare mat board for the calibration. Otherwise, its plenty for most non-pros. I bought the glass cutter that can be used with it and it works great. Be sure to buy a box a 50 razors, you'll need to change them often. I've had no troubles with the cutter, at least not enough to make me want to spend 3-4x more on a pro model. It takes about 5-10 mins to mark and cut a mat. I've even done multiple openings on it without any trouble.

HL carries the 450 and it qualifies for 40% off, which brings it to around the amazon price. FWIW, I've never used a pro cutter, so I may be in the situation of ignorance is bliss :)
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PLUSH
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Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:02 pm

JBFrame wrote:
PLUSH wrote:Not really a framing issue, more a cutting issue. I am looking for a cutter, to cut things like foamcore, cardboard (things along those lines). size 32 x 40.


I What other choice besides these.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/fletc ... ne-cutter/

this seems a way better price for what does what I need - just straight cuts.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004V8 ... S1XU3CI9F8

Any suggestions on the best for my needs?
The straight line cutter on Blick is just that - it will cut at 90 degrees only.
That is all I am looking for (just a straight cutter) I went to Kinkos yesterday to use their cutter. Not sure what they had, but it was crap. It uses a rolling sharpened disc. It just indented the foamcore and cardboard I was cutting. Plus it was really too thick.
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misterwhisper
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Tue Apr 29, 2014 2:46 pm

For just a straight cut (no bevel), all you need is a t-square and an x-acto, and a cutting mat or some scrap board to cut on. I have an architect's metal 30-inch t-square that I use for smaller cuts, and for larger ones I use a 48" drywall t-square. The architect's t-square is pretty expensive but very precise. Drywall t-squares are super cheap ($11 or so) but they aren't always as precise/square. Fortunately, though, pretty much any place that sells drywall t-squares also sells 45-90 triangles, so you can just use one of those to make sure you pick one that's true.
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appletree
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Thu May 08, 2014 10:23 am

Dust. Dust. And more dust. Oh and fuzzies.

Framing all my pictures last night so that things are ready to sell and be packaged if I ever get an order in. I found it nearly impossible to keep all the dust and stuff out. Any tips and tricks? I read that for plexi you should clean it first. So I used this first and to no avail. Then tried using some windex and that helped, but still it was a pain. Eventually I just used the wet portion of the wipe (because the dry portion kept leaving green dots/debris) and put the mat/picture in like 90%...let it dry a few seconds then plop it completely in. Inspect for dust and stuff and rinse/repeat until it worked.

Surely there is some better trick or something I can do. My room is clean and rarely used. I only use it for storing art, my framing, doing picture stuff, etc. I peel the outside of the acrylic (supposedly the stuff I am using it doesn't matter which side is in or out) and lay the glass down. Then pull the inside coating off and clean and lay the mat/image/foamcore down. Inspect then insert my points.

Any advice is appreciated.
<3 + Image = T.H.C.

:::Johnathon Powers Photography:::
Sail wrote:it was all just a misunderstandingtree.
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FramerDave
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Thu May 08, 2014 10:49 am

First, work with your matted art face-up on the table. Brush it off or use compressed air to get rid of dust.

Then remove the protective paper from the acrylic and quickly place it on top of the matted art. Then remove the outer paper from the acrylic and inspect. Brush or blow out any bits of crap. Then place the frame on the art/mat/acrylic, reach from underneath and flip the whole thing over and finish it off.

It's not as much a problem in Houston but low humidity will lead to static on acrylic. If it's a problem you could take a damp paper towel and wipe the paper on the acrylic before working with it. That little bit of moisture will help.

And for god's sake don't use Windex on acrylic.
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appletree
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Thu May 08, 2014 11:15 am

Great, thanks Dave. I owe you a beer one of these days. I only got two things framed last night, because it was just taking so damned long.

While we are on it how many points should I be inserting? Normally I am putting three on each of the long sides and two on the short sides. Too many? Frame size in this example is 16x17.

And I use one of these in my art room, favorite thing ever.

And good to know, will x the windex. Thanks again.
<3 + Image = T.H.C.

:::Johnathon Powers Photography:::
Sail wrote:it was all just a misunderstandingtree.
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shredkeenan
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Thu May 08, 2014 11:22 am

appletree wrote: While we are on it how many points should I be inserting? Normally I am putting three on each of the long sides and two on the short sides. Too many? Frame size in this example is 16x17.
Not that I'm a framing authority, but I space mine ~5" apart, so I probably would have done it just like you did.
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appletree
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Thu May 08, 2014 11:32 am

Sounds good. Thanks.
<3 + Image = T.H.C.

:::Johnathon Powers Photography:::
Sail wrote:it was all just a misunderstandingtree.
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FramerDave
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Thu May 08, 2014 5:30 pm

appletree wrote:Great, thanks Dave. I owe you a beer one of these days. I only got two things framed last night, because it was just taking so damned long.

While we are on it how many points should I be inserting? Normally I am putting three on each of the long sides and two on the short sides. Too many? Frame size in this example is 16x17.

And I use one of these in my art room, favorite thing ever.

And good to know, will x the windex. Thanks again.
A lot of framers use way too many points than necessary, especially with a pneumatic point gun. They're just so much fun. On the size you're working with I'd do three or four on each side.

Is that thing on Amazon some sort of kinky sex toy?
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Cinlabyrinth
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Thu May 08, 2014 6:03 pm

does framerdave have a shop here in Houston?
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FramerDave
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Thu May 08, 2014 6:42 pm

Cinlabyrinth wrote:does framerdave have a shop here in Houston?
Crap, I apologize. I got your PM a while ago but didn't answer right away so of course it fell off my radar.

But no, I don't own a shop. I work on the franchise side for The Great Frame Up. We have four stores in the Houston area, one in Pearland and the other three in the Spring/Cypress/NW area. If you go to www.thegreatframeup.com you can find the store closest to you by zip code.

As much as I'd love for you to use one of our stores they might not be convenient to you. In that case go to www.findapictureframer.com and you can find a PPFA member framer close to you.
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JBFrame
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Fri May 09, 2014 1:51 am

FramerDave wrote:First, work with your matted art face-up on the table. Brush it off or use compressed air to get rid of dust.

Then remove the protective paper from the acrylic and quickly place it on top of the matted art. Then remove the outer paper from the acrylic and inspect. Brush or blow out any bits of crap. Then place the frame on the art/mat/acrylic, reach from underneath and flip the whole thing over and finish it off.

It's not as much a problem in Houston but low humidity will lead to static on acrylic. If it's a problem you could take a damp paper towel and wipe the paper on the acrylic before working with it. That little bit of moisture will help.

And for god's sake don't use Windex on acrylic.
I agree totally with Framer Dave "FOR GOD'S SAKE DON'T US WINDEX ON ACRYLIC" I use distilled water with Shaklee. My formula is 3 drops of Shaklee Basic H Concentrated Organic Cleaner to 16 ounces of distilled water - I have had a 32 ounce bottle of Shaklee now for about 10 years and have only used at the most 1/4 of the bottle, it is good stuff for glass/acrylic cleaning.

To get rid of static try the Kinetronics Static Wisk #140. You can usually get them at your art supply store or on ebay.
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milligan
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Fri May 09, 2014 2:07 pm

I resolved my glazing source issue. Hobby Lobby sells UV glass for a great price after the coupon. I got a 32x40 UV treated sheet for $27. I brought a friend so I was able to get two pieces. The UV/AG coating is about 25% more while the museum is special order. I'm unsure if special order qualifies for the 40% coupon. You guys were definitely right though. The glass made specifically for framing looks substantially better than the cheap window glass.

Would you guys suggest the Logan point driver, not the cheap one but the lever action driver? I've been using cheap push in style points, but I'm about to use an oak frame which will not accept the ones I've been using. Will the Logan drive through hardwood? Even hickory?
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