Framing Help/Advice Thread

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.
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JBFrame
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Sun Apr 27, 2014 10:08 pm

milligan wrote:
KSUvet wrote:Why not just order some UV acrylic from American Frame or Frame Destination?
The anti-glare/UV acrylic from frame destination doesn't seem too pricey. I'll have to order one for a frame and see how it looks. Thanks.
What size do you need? If you are having a problem getting a reasonable price I would be willing to cut and ship to you. I don't know if I can meet their price w/shipping but I can try. I'm not really set up for online sales but I can help out now and then when necessary.
thekharmainitiative
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:58 am

peacedog wrote:Museum glass has a faint greenish reflection, but not nearly that of regular glass. It reduces reflection by 85% and has 97% light transmission (vs. Conservation Clear at 89%) for much truer color. Here’s a picture of our display taken on a bright evening, white truck out the door, tons of glare. You can see a significant difference here.
Image
ToolFanFromWayBack wrote:I get a lot of "is there even glass in there?" Followed by the inevitable fingerprint. Be prepared to de-fingerprint a lot.
Never ceases to amaze me, happens all the time at the shop as well. Sooo, you were ok with touching the art if it wasn't there? :roll:
I've noticed these museum glass displays all have some 3D object shadowboxed, never just a flat print up against (or near) the glass. From my experience with prints framed with museum glass, I feel like the effect is more noticeable in the shadowbox display than with a print. Anybody know if there is a comparison display with print/photos instead of some shadowboxed item, and if not, why not?
WhoLikesRingo wrote:This single post led to a roller coaster of emotion. Congrats kharma, king of the thread.
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milligan
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 1:21 am

JBFrame wrote:
milligan wrote:
KSUvet wrote:Why not just order some UV acrylic from American Frame or Frame Destination?
The anti-glare/UV acrylic from frame destination doesn't seem too pricey. I'll have to order one for a frame and see how it looks. Thanks.
What size do you need? If you are having a problem getting a reasonable price I would be willing to cut and ship to you. I don't know if I can meet their price w/shipping but I can try. I'm not really set up for online sales but I can help out now and then when necessary.
I'd appreciate that. I'll contact you when I do my next frame job. Thanks
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alittle
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:59 am

Looking at framing some ink on paper drawings. Drawings are right to the edge so I'm thinking about doing my standard 3/4" black frame, a 1/2 inch spacer, and the drawing floated on a black back mat. Any other suggestions?
Image
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KSUvet
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 7:24 am

milligan wrote:
KSUvet wrote:Why not just order some UV acrylic from American Frame or Frame Destination?
The anti-glare/UV acrylic from frame destination doesn't seem too pricey. I'll have to order one for a frame and see how it looks. Thanks.
I'd start with a smaller one. A lot of people hate the non-glare UV acrylic. I don't think it's too bad, depending on the lighting, but it's definitely a little fuzzy.

Edit: I have a photo in this thread that does a decent job of showing the difference between regular and non-glare acrylic: http://forum.expressobeans.com/viewtopi ... 31&t=80928
"I see dudes using cotton gloves on prints that I know were printed while someone was drinking a beer or eating Cheetos, while water leaked from the ceiling. And I'm not even talking about my shop!" - alexfugazi
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JBFrame
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:00 am

alittle wrote:Looking at framing some ink on paper drawings. Drawings are right to the edge so I'm thinking about doing my standard 3/4" black frame, a 1/2 inch spacer, and the drawing floated on a black back mat. Any other suggestions?
How about a sink mount - still looks like floating but the upper mat is cut a little larger than the drawing, a foam core space is attached to get the upper mat, then the lower mat is attached and then the drawing is hinged to the lower mat. The drawing is way lower than the upper mat giving a 3 dimensional look. If you wanted to really give it a floating look you could also hinge the drawing to another AF foam core or 8 ply rag that is cut slightly smaller than the drawing and attach the AF foam core to the lower mat. That will raise the drawing up slightly from the bottom mat but it is still lower than the upper mat - lots of work but it looks great when done.
Last edited by JBFrame on Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:07 am, edited 3 times in total.
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peacedog
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:02 am

thekharmainitiative wrote:
I've noticed these museum glass displays all have some 3D object shadowboxed, never just a flat print up against (or near) the glass. From my experience with prints framed with museum glass, I feel like the effect is more noticeable in the shadowbox display than with a print. Anybody know if there is a comparison display with print/photos instead of some shadowboxed item, and if not, why not?
TruVue uses a shadow box to demonstrate clarity and color transmission effectiveness when the glass is not right against the image, which is typically considered the more challenging situation. I haven't seen a 2D sample box in a long time, but I've never noticed a visual difference between the two styles.
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alittle
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:16 am

JBFrame wrote:
alittle wrote:Looking at framing some ink on paper drawings. Drawings are right to the edge so I'm thinking about doing my standard 3/4" black frame, a 1/2 inch spacer, and the drawing floated on a black back mat. Any other suggestions?
How about a sink mount - still looks like floating but the upper mat is cut a little larger than the drawing, a foam core space is attached to get the upper mat, then the lower mat is attached and then the drawing is hinged to the lower mat. The drawing is way lower than the upper mat giving a 3 dimensional look. If you wanted to really give it a floating look you could also hinge the drawing to another AF foam core or 8 ply rag that is cut slightly smaller than the drawing and attach the AF foam core to the lower mat. That will raise the drawing up slightly from the bottom mat but it is still lower than the upper mat - lots of work but it looks great when done.
Thanks for the suggestion. Do you have any examples handy so I can visualize this?
Image
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JBFrame
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:57 am

[/quote]Thanks for the suggestion. Do you have any examples handy so I can visualize this?[/quote]

No, don't have a sample unfortunately but it would be really hard to get a picture to show the effects anyway - I'm a really bad photographer :roll: If/when you stop by I can show you, it will be worth the look see.
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Tazgarde
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 11:02 am

Is it common practice to tape around the edge of your glass/mat/print/foamboard to create a sandwich, then just drop the sandwich into the frame?

I've mounted up two prints using this technique and I have found it works pretty well. Would I still need to seal the back of the frame if I've already sealed the sandwich?
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JBFrame
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 11:05 am

peacedog wrote:
thekharmainitiative wrote:
I've noticed these museum glass displays all have some 3D object shadowboxed, never just a flat print up against (or near) the glass. From my experience with prints framed with museum glass, I feel like the effect is more noticeable in the shadowbox display than with a print. Anybody know if there is a comparison display with print/photos instead of some shadowboxed item, and if not, why not?
TruVue uses a shadow box to demonstrate clarity and color transmission effectiveness when the glass is not right against the image, which is typically considered the more challenging situation. I haven't seen a 2D sample box in a long time, but I've never noticed a visual difference between the two styles.
Image I framed my own 2D sample box. The very left is Museum, the center is Conservation Reflection Control, and on the right is Conservation Clear. It works really good to show the customer the difference in the glass quality.
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JBFrame
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 11:10 am

Tazgarde wrote:Is it common practice to tape around the edge of your glass/mat/print/foamboard to create a sandwich, then just drop the sandwich into the frame?

I've mounted up two prints using this technique and I have found it works pretty well. Would I still need to seal the back of the frame if I've already sealed the sandwich?
In really high humidity areas of the country that is a standard practice. I use it now and then for a frame package that will be hung in a high humidity area like a bathroom or pool area. Even with the sandwich package you have to be really cautious with the humidity buildup due to temperature changes. It is really nice to help keep the critters out of the art package though.
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FramerDave
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:09 pm

peacedog wrote:
thekharmainitiative wrote:
I've noticed these museum glass displays all have some 3D object shadowboxed, never just a flat print up against (or near) the glass. From my experience with prints framed with museum glass, I feel like the effect is more noticeable in the shadowbox display than with a print. Anybody know if there is a comparison display with print/photos instead of some shadowboxed item, and if not, why not?
TruVue uses a shadow box to demonstrate clarity and color transmission effectiveness when the glass is not right against the image, which is typically considered the more challenging situation. I haven't seen a 2D sample box in a long time, but I've never noticed a visual difference between the two styles.
TruVue has a demo available which has a 2D print framed with regular Conservation Clear on one side, Conservation Reflection Control on the right and Museum Glass in the middle. It has a black mat on the print, which also has a dark background, to really show the difference.
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PLUSH
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:15 pm

Not really a framing issue, more a cutting issue. I am looking for a cutter, to cut things like foamcore, cardboard (things along those lines). size 32 x 40.


I What other choice besides these.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/fletc ... ne-cutter/

this seems a way better price for what does what I need - just straight cuts.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004V8 ... S1XU3CI9F8

Any suggestions on the best for my needs?
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Tazgarde
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Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:47 pm

PLUSH wrote:Not really a framing issue, more a cutting issue. I am looking for a cutter, to cut things like foamcore, cardboard (things along those lines). size 32 x 40.


I What other choice besides these.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/fletc ... ne-cutter/

this seems a way better price for what does what I need - just straight cuts.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004V8 ... S1XU3CI9F8

Any suggestions on the best for my needs?
I have the Logan 450 and I love it. It can handle up to 40" mats and comes with straight and bevel cutters. It takes a little bit of playing around with to get accurate corner cuts for windows, otherwise it's solid. I've framed up an 8x8 handbill and two 24x36's with double mats and they turned out as good as I could have hoped.
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