Getting wrinkles/waves out of tracing paper?

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hellosir
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Thu Jul 01, 2010 1:56 pm

Ok here goes

I have an ink sketch on tracing paper matted and framed, and the wrinkles and waves in the paper are driving me nuts. it is completely taking away my appreciation of the work. All of them are not in the ink image area, just in the dead space. So my question is this-are there any methods to remove them? I have read about the ironing method on prints, but that would seem to work fine on heavier paper. Would this apply to tracing paper as well, or is this medium too fragile?

I realize this is a long shot, but if anyone can help I would appreciate it
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mistersmith
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Thu Jul 01, 2010 3:09 pm

I say roll with it. I'm guessing the damage is really handling wear, because the piece was used to create the blackline for a screenprint...if so, you gotta love and accept it -- it's part of the process.
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mattlew69
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Thu Jul 01, 2010 3:23 pm

i reuse gift wrap tissue paper by ironing it, which is very thin. yes, i am a recycling hippy.

all you have to do, is put the iron on a very low setting and place a towel underneath the tracing paper. you may even want to place another thin towel over the tracing paper. i would also get some similar type paper to test it out on first, before you use the original piece of art.
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heather_honey
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Thu Jul 01, 2010 3:29 pm

I've never tried this so I'm not speaking from experience but ink on thin paper + heat of an iron sounds like a bad idea. The ink could easily heat and smudge, imo. I'd go with mistersmith and appreciate the condition, it likely was from the process.
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CHR1S
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Fri Jul 02, 2010 12:51 pm

You might also check to see how the paper was attached to the mat. Ideally the paper should only be attached with two pieces of acid free or PH neutral tape on the top of the sheet (there are other methods as well but I won't go into all of them). If too much tape is placed on the paper it can't move. Paper can change shape overtime and if it's not hinged properly to the mat it can't move or settle in the mat. Humidity will cause the paper to change shape. Tracing paper in general is so delicate and any introduction of water or liquid (such as ink) is going to cause it to buckle or wrinkle. It's just the nature of the paper.
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jamesgunter
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Fri Jul 02, 2010 2:19 pm

you can find a paper conservator who can mount it on rice paper (similar to drymounting, but its completely archival in every way and completely reversible. museums do it all the time) and that will make it lay flat. it might cost you $50-$200 or so depending on the size though.
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hellosir
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Fri Jul 02, 2010 11:07 pm

Thanks for all the replies gents, I really appreciate them all!
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