Framing

Information on shipping, storing and repairing your art, plus your reviews on products for art collecting, making, storing, etc..
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hogie777
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Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:03 pm

Hi all, got another noob question.

I recently purchased a lot of prints and bought frames at Michaels for them and stuck them in. Now I am reading about custom framing, UV glass, spacers and matts and I am worried that the way I framed my prints will harm them. How long do you think I can get away with them in a standard off the shelf frame before I seriously need to consider dropping money to get them properly protected? If I understand correctly from these threads, it costs roughtly about $200 to custom frame each print. Any advise would be great.

Thank you!
“We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams” - Willy Wonka
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mistersmith
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Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:13 pm

There are too many variables to give you a straight answer. Your lighting situation, climate, the frames you already bought, the kinds of stuff you've framed, all that effects the time something can sit in a frame and not suffer for it.

But, super generally, if something's out of direct light and not in a bathroom or a swamp, and isn't pressed against very bad things like corrugated cardboard or shitty colored mats, you've got a while before white paper yellows. 6 months to a year? Less time before fading. A few months? If it's on colored stock, fading is already happening.
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bulkhead72
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Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:18 pm

If you are happy with the frames you have currently (i.e. they get the job done and you are satisfied), you can always just upgrade the backing and mat to acid free, and the glass to UV/plexi, as well as buy spacers (if needed), as opposed to ditching the older frames altogether. Also, if you have a very valuable print and intend on framing it, then it makes sense to go the whole 9 yards and getting a nice custom job done.
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hogie777
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Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:21 pm

bulkhead72 wrote:If you are happy with the frames you have currently (i.e. they get the job done and you are satisfied), you can always just upgrade the backing and mat to acid free, and the glass to UV/plexi, as well as buy spacers (if needed), as opposed to ditching the older frames altogether. Also, if you have a very valuable print and intend on framing it, then it makes sense to go the whole 9 yards and getting a nice custom job done.
Where can I get the UV glass and the acid free backing/spacers?
“We are the music makers, and we are the dreamers of dreams” - Willy Wonka
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bulkhead72
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Fri Dec 28, 2012 6:26 pm

hogie777 wrote:
bulkhead72 wrote:If you are happy with the frames you have currently (i.e. they get the job done and you are satisfied), you can always just upgrade the backing and mat to acid free, and the glass to UV/plexi, as well as buy spacers (if needed), as opposed to ditching the older frames altogether. Also, if you have a very valuable print and intend on framing it, then it makes sense to go the whole 9 yards and getting a nice custom job done.
Where can I get the UV glass and the acid free backing/spacers?
Hmm, the UV plexi/glass would have to be cut and done by the framer. I don't do too much DIY, so maybe someone else can weigh in. You should be able to find acid free backing and mats at your local framers' or art supply store. I am sure there are many options in NY.
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wizzack
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Sat Dec 29, 2012 1:27 am

hogie777 wrote:
bulkhead72 wrote:If you are happy with the frames you have currently (i.e. they get the job done and you are satisfied), you can always just upgrade the backing and mat to acid free, and the glass to UV/plexi, as well as buy spacers (if needed), as opposed to ditching the older frames altogether. Also, if you have a very valuable print and intend on framing it, then it makes sense to go the whole 9 yards and getting a nice custom job done.
Where can I get the UV glass and the acid free backing/spacers?
you can get uv glass and spacers if required at hobby lobby and michaels if you have them. There's other chain stores that carry them, maybe Aaron bros?
smm24339
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Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:39 am

wizzack wrote:
hogie777 wrote:
bulkhead72 wrote:If you are happy with the frames you have currently (i.e. they get the job done and you are satisfied), you can always just upgrade the backing and mat to acid free, and the glass to UV/plexi, as well as buy spacers (if needed), as opposed to ditching the older frames altogether. Also, if you have a very valuable print and intend on framing it, then it makes sense to go the whole 9 yards and getting a nice custom job done.
Where can I get the UV glass and the acid free backing/spacers?
you can get uv glass and spacers if required at hobby lobby and michaels if you have them. There's other chain stores that carry them, maybe Aaron bros?
Hogie

I did the exact same thing! I'm in the process of getting them out and into temporary storage (some sort of portfolio with the polypropylene sheets). My habit has not turned too bad yet so i dont have a ton of prints. And I don't have the room for a flat file.
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misterwhisper
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Sat Dec 29, 2012 3:56 am

hogie777 wrote:
bulkhead72 wrote:If you are happy with the frames you have currently (i.e. they get the job done and you are satisfied), you can always just upgrade the backing and mat to acid free, and the glass to UV/plexi, as well as buy spacers (if needed), as opposed to ditching the older frames altogether. Also, if you have a very valuable print and intend on framing it, then it makes sense to go the whole 9 yards and getting a nice custom job done.
Where can I get the UV glass and the acid free backing/spacers?
You can go back to Michael's and purchase acid-free backing -- look for archival foamboard. They can cut UV glass/plexi too, but it's expensive. If you're using standard-sized frames, there's a good chance that you can buy pre-cut standard-size UV plexi for less at bags unlimited:
http://www.bagsunlimited.com/c-438-clea ... ts.aspx#UV
or you purchase it custom-cut to your specs here:
http://www.acrylite-shop.com/US/us/cutt ... rom=detail
If you prefer UV glass, it doesn't ship well so it will most likely have to be purchased locally.
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