hey photographers, post your photos

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shootsright77
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Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:13 pm

Today at lunch with pano on the iphone, no photoshopping
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TheThirdEye
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Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:05 pm

Took these shots at my brothers property this past weekend. Small pine seedlings sprouting up with the seed still attached at the top. Two of them right next to each other. I thought it was pretty cool. The first shot is the best of the bunch. Second one has some focus issues.

Image

Image
Image
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entropy
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Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:11 pm

hi everyone. Slightly off topic here... but you're probably the only ones on EB that can help me. I'm about to purchase a photograph. It is a vintage "fiber-based silver gelatin" print (not sure what that means, but sounds cool). The only one that the artist created for this image. (Although he mentioned he also has two "RC" prints, but the fiber-based is more collectible). This was an image from back in the 90s (when not everything was digital). So I was surprised he still had this available after all these years (it's an image that was pretty haunting to me as a kid)

So my question about collecting photography: Does an artist usually sign their photographs? It's a very small 5" x 7" (paper is 11" x 14") and it would seem that the signature would detract from the photo... If YES, do they usually sign within the image? or like most art prints, on the white border? The artist has offered to sign it (along with a collaborator), but I'm leaning against it (of all the framed photography I've seen in museums, I honestly don't recall seeing any signed (but that could be because I wasn't paying attention)... Although I think I'd feel awkward asking him to draft a COA for this piece and sign that instead, but I think that's what I prefer... Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
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jazzgalaxy
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Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:21 pm

entropy wrote:hi everyone. Slightly off topic here... but you're probably the only ones on EB that can help me. I'm about to purchase a photograph. It is a vintage "fiber-based silver gelatin" print (not sure what that means, but sounds cool). The only one that the artist created for this image. (Although he mentioned he also has two "RC" prints, but the fiber-based is more collectible). This was an image from back in the 90s (when not everything was digital). So I was surprised he still had this available after all these years (it's an image that was pretty haunting to me as a kid)

So my question about collecting photography: Does an artist usually sign their photographs? It's a very small 5" x 7" (paper is 11" x 14") and it would seem that the signature would detract from the photo... If YES, do they usually sign within the image? or like most art prints, on the white border? The artist has offered to sign it (along with a collaborator), but I'm leaning against it (of all the framed photography I've seen in museums, I honestly don't recall seeing any signed (but that could be because I wasn't paying attention)... Although I think I'd feel awkward asking him to draft a COA for this piece and sign that instead, but I think that's what I prefer... Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
I am by no means an authority, but most editioned photography work that I've seen is signed and numbered below the photo in the border, usually with the name of the piece penciled in the middle:

xx/xx ------------------------------ "Title of Photograph" ------------------------- Artist signature

or some variation.

Again, that's just from my experience. Hope it helps.
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parlow
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Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:32 pm

entropy wrote:hi everyone. Slightly off topic here... but you're probably the only ones on EB that can help me. I'm about to purchase a photograph. It is a vintage "fiber-based silver gelatin" print (not sure what that means, but sounds cool). The only one that the artist created for this image. (Although he mentioned he also has two "RC" prints, but the fiber-based is more collectible). This was an image from back in the 90s (when not everything was digital). So I was surprised he still had this available after all these years (it's an image that was pretty haunting to me as a kid)

So my question about collecting photography: Does an artist usually sign their photographs? It's a very small 5" x 7" (paper is 11" x 14") and it would seem that the signature would detract from the photo... If YES, do they usually sign within the image? or like most art prints, on the white border? The artist has offered to sign it (along with a collaborator), but I'm leaning against it (of all the framed photography I've seen in museums, I honestly don't recall seeing any signed (but that could be because I wasn't paying attention)... Although I think I'd feel awkward asking him to draft a COA for this piece and sign that instead, but I think that's what I prefer... Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
Lol. It's not an edition-ed release, so a signature or a COA doesn't really matter. Get a signature wherever you prefer.
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mistersmith
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Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:39 pm

If the piece is sold framed and matted, it's also very common to sign the mat.
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srdzevon
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Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:45 pm

I always sign my pieces on the mat. If you're worried about the sig, I'm sure he'd sign it on the back instead if you like. That way it's there for authenticating and not in the viewable image. I'm a fan of the sig on the front though. Gives credit to the artist.
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entropy
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Wed Mar 31, 2010 5:57 pm

jazzgalaxy wrote: I am by no means an authority, but most editioned photography work that I've seen is signed and numbered below the photo in the border, usually with the name of the piece penciled in the middle:
parlow wrote: Lol. It's not an edition-ed release, so a signature or a COA doesn't really matter. Get a signature wherever you prefer.
mistersmith wrote:If the piece is sold framed and matted, it's also very common to sign the mat.
srdzevon wrote:I always sign my pieces on the mat. If you're worried about the sig, I'm sure he'd sign it on the back instead if you like. That way it's there for authenticating and not in the viewable image. I'm a fan of the sig on the front though. Gives credit to the artist.
Hey thanks for all the replies!! Really helps. That's right, this is not an editioned release. It's the only vintage darkroom fiber-based print he created for it. Also, it is matted... The artist provided his # so I'll probably discuss with him this evening. I will likely request a signature. Now need to decide whether on the back or on the mat.
Again, thanks guys...
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greasy
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Thu Apr 01, 2010 12:49 am

Image

more here from tonights shoot at the recording studio

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jayscollec ... 620973997/
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ceevee
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Thu Apr 01, 2010 12:54 am

entropy wrote:
Hey thanks for all the replies!! Really helps. That's right, this is not an editioned release. It's the only vintage darkroom fiber-based print he created for it. Also, it is matted... The artist provided his # so I'll probably discuss with him this evening. I will likely request a signature. Now need to decide whether on the back or on the mat.
Again, thanks guys...
Signing on the mat is nice. That way you can opt to display with the sig or, if you find it distracting, switch out the mat...provided it is archivally affixed.
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electrachrome
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Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:38 am

entropy wrote:hi everyone. Slightly off topic here... but you're probably the only ones on EB that can help me. I'm about to purchase a photograph. It is a vintage "fiber-based silver gelatin" print (not sure what that means, but sounds cool). The only one that the artist created for this image. (Although he mentioned he also has two "RC" prints, but the fiber-based is more collectible). This was an image from back in the 90s (when not everything was digital). So I was surprised he still had this available after all these years (it's an image that was pretty haunting to me as a kid)

So my question about collecting photography: Does an artist usually sign their photographs? It's a very small 5" x 7" (paper is 11" x 14") and it would seem that the signature would detract from the photo... If YES, do they usually sign within the image? or like most art prints, on the white border? The artist has offered to sign it (along with a collaborator), but I'm leaning against it (of all the framed photography I've seen in museums, I honestly don't recall seeing any signed (but that could be because I wasn't paying attention)... Although I think I'd feel awkward asking him to draft a COA for this piece and sign that instead, but I think that's what I prefer... Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
1. fiber-based silver gelatin is an archival paper used in photo printing. stable for over 100 years if stored/displayed properly. RC (resin coated - if I remember correctly) paper is cheaper and not long term archival.

2. it's common to sign on the back of the photo. as others have mentioned, signing the matte is common practice. signatures are almost always in pencil.
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srdzevon
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Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:43 am

Pencil? I sign mine in rattle can.
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_benjammin
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Thu Apr 01, 2010 11:31 am

TheThirdEye wrote:Took these shots at my brothers property this past weekend. Small pine seedlings sprouting up with the seed still attached at the top. Two of them right next to each other. I thought it was pretty cool. The first shot is the best of the bunch. Second one has some focus issues.

Image

Image
Little drymounters are all over my yard.
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electrachrome
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Fri Apr 09, 2010 5:32 pm

Image
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Fri Apr 09, 2010 5:45 pm

electrachrome wrote:Image
dope!
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