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jamel-d
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Wed Apr 01, 2015 4:39 pm

Phew. I thought you were referring to The Beatles breakup.
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geezer
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Wed Apr 01, 2015 10:47 pm

Robert Z’Dar, Cult ‘Maniac Cop’ Actor, Dead at 64
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mattkardish
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Wed Apr 01, 2015 11:21 pm

geezer wrote:Hall of Famer Chuck Bednarik dead at 89. The guy who destroyed Frank Gifford.
Fly Eagles fly
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jlabbate
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Tue Apr 07, 2015 10:01 am

James Best (aka Roscoe P. Coltrane from Dukes of Hazzard)
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/entert ... 97600.html
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OtomoChaser
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Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:39 pm

Tom Towles, age 65 - most memorable for his disturbing portrayal of the character Otis in 'Henry:Portrait of a serial killer'. :( :( :(
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jjbehren
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Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:46 pm

jlabbate wrote:James Best (aka Roscoe P. Coltrane from Dukes of Hazzard)
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/entert ... 97600.html
To add insult to injury, he made it just long enough to see 'dem Duke boys win the National Championship.
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fredo
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Tue Apr 07, 2015 5:57 pm

jjbehren wrote:
jlabbate wrote:James Best (aka Roscoe P. Coltrane from Dukes of Hazzard)
http://www.charlotteobserver.com/entert ... 97600.html
To add insult to injury, he made it just long enough to see 'dem Duke boys win the National Championship.
ZING!
just a foil for me today, thanks
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gorkie
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Wed Apr 08, 2015 8:19 am

Juliette Lewis' actor dad, Geoffrey Lewis, passed away. Great actor. That movie Salem's Lot still haunts me sometimes.

Feel terrible for Juliette. She is one of my favorites. Even if she is on the same Crazy train as Tom Cruise and John Travolta.
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It's not what you look at that matters, it's what you see. - Thoreau
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Darkknight37
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Wed Apr 08, 2015 9:59 am

Bummer, he was one great actor. In TONS of my favorite movies.
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jlabbate
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Tue Apr 14, 2015 10:57 am

jamel-d
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Wed Apr 22, 2015 5:40 pm

Model for Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter painting dies at 92

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HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Mary Doyle Keefe, the model for Norman Rockwell's iconic 1943 Rosie the Riveter painting that symbolized the millions of American women who went to work on the home front during World War II, has died. She was 92.

Keefe died Tuesday in Simsbury, Connecticut, after a brief illness, said her daughter, Mary Ellen Keefe.

Keefe grew up in Arlington, Vermont, where she met Rockwell — who lived in West Arlington — and posed for his painting when she was a 19-year-old telephone operator. The painting was on the cover of the Saturday Evening Post on May 29, 1943.

Although Keefe was petite, Rockwell's Rosie the Riveter had large arms, hands and shoulders. The painting shows the red-haired Rosie in blue jean work overalls sitting down, with a sandwich in her left hand, her right arm atop a lunchbox with the name "Rosie" on it, a rivet gun on her lap and her feet resting on a copy of Adolf Hitler's manifesto "Mein Kampf." The entire background is a waving American flag.

Rockwell wanted Rosie to show strength and modeled her body on Michelangelo's Isaiah, which is on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.

Keefe, who never riveted herself, was paid $5 for each of two mornings she posed for Rockwell and his photographer, Gene Pelham, whose pictures Rockwell used when he painted.

"You sit there and he takes all these pictures," Keefe told The Associated Press in 2002. "They called me again to come back because he wanted me in a blue shirt and asked if I could wear penny loafers."

Twenty-four years after she posed, Rockwell sent her a letter calling her the most beautiful woman he'd ever seen and apologizing for the hefty body in the painting.

"I did have to make you into a sort of a giant," he wrote.

The Rosie painting — not to be confused with a poster by a Pittsburgh artist depicting a woman flexing her arm under the words "We Can Do It" — would later be used in a nationwide effort to sell war bonds.

Keefe said people in Arlington didn't make too much of a fuss about her being in the Rosie painting, aside from teasing her a little about Rosie's big arms.

"People didn't make a big deal about things back then," she told the AP.

The painting is now part of the permanent collection at the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas.

Keefe spent the last eight years in a retirement community in Simsbury, according to an obituary prepared by her family.

She graduated from Temple University with a degree in dental hygiene, and was working as a dental hygienist in Bennington, Vermont, when she met her husband of 55 years, Robert Keefe, who died in 2003. They had four children and lived in Whitman, Massachusetts, and later in Nashua, New Hampshire.

Keefe's family will receive friends and take part in a memorial Mass on Friday at McLean Village in Simsbury. A graveside service is scheduled for Saturday at Park Lawn Cemetery in Bennington.
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jamel-d
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Thu Apr 30, 2015 9:56 am

Jack Ely, ‘Louie Louie’ Singer for Kingsmen, Dies

Jack Ely would later insist that as a 19-year-old singing “Louie Louie” in one take in a Portland, Ore., studio in 1963, he had followed the original lyrics faithfully. But, he admitted, the braces on his teeth had just been tightened, and he was howling to be heard over the band, with his head tilted awkwardly at a 45-degree angle at a single microphone dangling from the ceiling to simulate a live concert.

Which may explain why what originated innocently as a lovesick sailor’s calypso lament to a bartender named Louie morphed into the incoherent, three-chord garage-band cult classic by the Kingsmen that sold millions of copies, spawned countless cover versions and variations, was banned in Indiana, prompted the F.B.I. to investigate whether the song was secretly obscene, provoked a legal battle and became what Frank Zappa called “an archetypal American musical icon.”

For Mr. Ely, the 2-minute-42-second demo recording turned out to be a one-hit wonder. He was bounced from the group, which he helped found in 1959, after the drummer, Lynn Easton, decided he wanted to be the lead singer instead.

Mr. Ely died on Tuesday at 71 at his home in Redmond, Ore. His son Sean said that Mr. Ely was a Christian Scientist and had not sought treatment, but that he believed the cause was skin cancer.

Jack Brown Ely was born in Portland on Sept. 11, 1943. His father, Ken, was a singer of such prominence, Dave Marsh wrote in “Louie Louie” (1993) — one of several books prompted by the song — that the crooner Rudy Vallee sent him a congratulatory telegram when his only son was born. Ken Ely died when Jack was 4.

He began taking piano lessons and gave his first recital before he was 7, then discovered the guitar when he was 13 and saw Elvis Presley on “The Ed Sullivan Show.”

After Lynn Easton’s mother enlisted Jack to perform at a local yacht club, joined by high school colleagues, the Kingsmen were born. They never practiced at Jack’s house (his stepfather hated the racket), but the band prospered even as they graduated and Jack enrolled at Portland State University.

In 1962, while playing at a club in Seaside, Ore., he noticed that the jukebox was spinning overtime with Rockin’ Robin Roberts and the Wailers’ 1961 version of “Louie Louie,” a song that Richard Berry, a Los Angeles musician, had written on a napkin and recorded in 1957.

Mr. Ely persuaded the Kingsmen and the band’s manager to record the song. They booked the Northwestern Inc. studio in Portland for an hour on April 6, 1963.

“It was more yelling than singing ’cause I was trying to be heard over all the instruments,” Mr. Ely recalled, according to Peter Blecha, a music historian, in his book “Sonic Boom! The History of Northwest Rock: From ‘Louie Louie’ to ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’ ” (2009). He also began the third verse a few bars too soon and paused while the band caught up.

In an interview with the Oregon newspaper The Bend Bulletin in 1987, Mr. Ely recalled: “I stood there and yelled while the whole band was playing, and when it was over, we hated it. We thought it was a totally non-quality recording.”

Paul Revere and the Raiders, another Portland band, recorded the song the same week. Arnie Ginsburg, a Boston disc jockey known as Woo-Woo, played the Kingsmen’s version twice and pronounced it the worst recording of the week. But it became a No. 2 hit nationally and stayed in the Top 40 for 13 weeks. In 2007, Rolling Stone magazine called it the No. 4 most influential recording of all time.

Ousted by Mr. Easton in August 1963, Mr. Ely tried and failed to rejoin the band after the song became a hit. He formed his own band, which he initially also called the Kingsmen, and recorded “Love That Louie,” prompting lawsuits that required Wand Records to credit him as lead vocalist on future “Louie Louie” pressings, granted him $6,000 in royalties and barred Mr. Easton from lip-syncing the song in television appearances, according to Mr. Marsh.

Mr. Ely was drafted into the Army, returned to the United States in 1968, trained horses, was active in Rockers Against Drugs and was an advocate of legislation that would grant royalties to recording artists and record labels as well as songwriters.

Sean Ely said his father’s other survivors were his third wife, Dawn; another son, Robert; and a daughter, Sierra.

High school and college students who thought they understood what Mr. Ely was singing traded transcripts of their meticulously researched translations of the lyrics. The F.B.I. began investigating after an Indiana parent wrote to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy in 1964: “My daughter brought home a record of ‘LOUIE LOUIE’ and I, after reading that the record had been banned on the air because it was obscene, proceeded to try to decipher the jumble of words. The lyrics are so filthy that I cannot enclose them in this letter.”

The F.B.I. Laboratory’s efforts at decryption were less fruitful. After more than two years and a 455-page report, the bureau concluded that “three governmental agencies dropped their investigations because they were unable to determine what the lyrics of the song were, even after listening to the records at speeds ranging from 16 r.p.m. to 78 r.p.m.”

Mr. Berry’s words, with a first verse that begins, “Fine little girl she wait for me/Me catch the ship for ’cross the sea,” are in fact completely benign. Whatever obscenities people thought they heard, the Kingsmen’s version hewed closely to the original — lyrically if not musically.

Mr. Blecha said Mr. Ely had assured him he had not inserted “incorrect lyrics,” but Mr. Blecha was convinced that Mr. Easton had uttered a single four-letter obscenity in the background of the recording when he accidentally struck the rim of his drum.

Asked to account for the song’s popularity, Mr. Blecha replied, “You could dance to it, and as kids, with the rumors that there was something nefarious going on, you couldn’t grab our attention with anything better than that.”

A version of this article appears in print on April 30, 2015, on page A28 of the New York edition with the headline: Jack Ely, 71, Who Sang the Kingsmen’s ‘Louie Louie’.
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jamel-d
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Fri May 01, 2015 10:36 am

Ben E King: R&B legend dies at 76

R&B and soul singer Ben E King, best known for the classic song Stand By Me, has died at the age of 76.
King started his career in the late 1950s with The Drifters, singing on hits including There Goes My Baby and Save The Last Dance For Me.
After going solo, he hit the US top five with Stand By Me in 1961.
It returned to the charts in the 1980s, including a three-week spell at number one in the UK, following its use in the film of the same name and a TV advert.
The song has charted nine times on the US Billboard 100 over the years - King's version twice and seven times with covers by artists like John Lennon and Spyder Turner.
It was also sampled for Sean Kingston's 2007 number one single Beautiful Girls.
In 1999, the BMI announced that the song, written by King with Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, was the fourth most-played track of the 20th Century on US radio and TV.
Earlier this year, the US Library of Congress added it to the National Recording Registry, declaring that "it was King's incandescent vocal that made it a classic".
King's other hits included Spanish Harlem, Amor, Don't Play That Song (You Lied) and Supernatural Thing - Part I.
The singer died on Thursday, his publicist Phil Brown told BBC News.
Fellow musician Gary US Bonds wrote on Facebook that King was "one of the sweetest, gentlest and gifted souls that I have had the privilege of knowing and calling my friend for more than 50 years".
He wrote: "I can tell you that Ben E will be missed more than words can say. Our sincere condolences go out to Betty and the entire family.
"Thank you Ben E for your friendship and the wonderful legacy you leave behind."
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Born Benjamin Earl Nelson, he initially joined a doo-wop group called The Five Crowns, who became The Drifters after that group's manager fired the band's previous members.
He co-wrote and sang on the band's single There Goes My Baby, which reached number two in the US in 1959.
But the group members were paid just $100 per week by their manager and, after a request for a pay rise was turned down, the singer decided to go it alone. In the process, he adopted the surname King.
His first solo hit, in 1961, was Spanish Harlem, which was followed by Stand By Me.
He originally intended Stand By Me for The Drifters, but said they turned it down. So he worked on it when Atlantic Records boss Ahmet Ertegun paired him with Leiber and Stoller.
"In my vocal I think you can hear something of my earlier times when I'd sing in subway halls for the echo, and perform doo-wop on street corners," he told The Guardian in 2013.
"But I had a lot of influences, too - singers like Sam Cooke, Brook Benton and Roy Hamilton. The song's success lay in the way Leiber and Stoller took chances, though, borrowing from symphonic scores, and we had a brilliant string arranger."
Stand By Me, Spanish Harlem and There Goes My Baby were all named on the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's list of 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll, and were all given a Grammy Hall of Fame Award.
As the 1960s went on and rock 'n' roll took off, King's commercial success waned.
He continued to tour and, in the mid-1970s, Ertegun was so impressed by one of his shows in Miami that he decided to re-sign him to Atlantic.
That led to a return to the charts with Supernatural Thing - Part I, which reached the US top five in 1975.
He returned to the spotlight again in the late 1980s when Stand By Me was the theme song for Rob Reiner's film about boyhood friendship and was used in a British TV commercial for Levi's jeans.
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technique
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Mon May 11, 2015 2:27 pm

Chris Burden dies at 69 years old. His performance art was always crazy notably the piece where he had himself shot in the arm.

http://touch.latimes.com/#section/-1/ar ... -83507461/
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ColonelCash
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Mon May 11, 2015 3:01 pm

Sad note: B.B. King is in Hospice care.
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