Floating a Print

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.

Postby CrustaR on Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:31 pm

sixstringer wrote:
CrustaR wrote:How would you float a print so that it actually has the float effect like where the artwork is raised up a bit?

I'm doing one here coming up and I've never done it.

http://www.frametek.com/HTML/Articles/F ... nting.html


Ah, right on. Thanks. That's a cool way of framing.
User avatar
CrustaR
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 4172
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 6:34 pm
Location: Austin, TX
pewter14 wrote:You're not the only one on the hunt for The Thing ... just ... the most obvious ... by a lot.

Postby CrustaR on Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:43 pm

As far as this Japanese hinging paper goes, is there a possibility of damaging the print when using it?
User avatar
CrustaR
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 4172
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 6:34 pm
Location: Austin, TX
pewter14 wrote:You're not the only one on the hunt for The Thing ... just ... the most obvious ... by a lot.

Postby mazdog on Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:51 pm

yes if you get it too wet, you could conceivably get the print paper too wet.............having said that, you would have to be pretty out of it to wet the hinge that much and then apply it to print.

I highly recommend messing around with hinging paper on some scrape material first, you will quickly get an idea of how much water is not enough and what would obviously be to much. The amount needed to properly wet the adhesive is far from enough to do any damage.

Edit....just to be clear, I am talking about using the Hayaku pre-gummed Japanese Hinging Paper from Lineco. I think using wheat starch and mulberry paper, could be a considerably trickier endeavor.....
Last edited by mazdog on Thu Jun 23, 2011 3:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
mazdog
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1318
Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2010 2:43 pm
Location: AZ
Image

Postby CrustaR on Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:56 pm

Oh, yeah, I've got some $0 prints I can test this out on.

Another random Q about floating a print:

As far as the frame/glass size goes in relation to the print, is a 10% increase suitable, so for say a 24x36 print, you would use a 26x39 frame?

Apologies for all the questions, but I just like to be sure I am doing everything right.
User avatar
CrustaR
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 4172
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 6:34 pm
Location: Austin, TX
pewter14 wrote:You're not the only one on the hunt for The Thing ... just ... the most obvious ... by a lot.

Postby Mention on Thu Jun 23, 2011 3:01 pm

CrustaR wrote:Oh, yeah, I've got some $0 prints I can test this out on.

Another random Q about floating a print:

As far as the frame/glass size goes in relation to the print, is a 10% increase suitable, so for say a 24x36 print, you would use a 26x39 frame?

Apologies for all the questions, but I just like to be sure I am doing everything right.


There is no right or wrong. Go with what looks good to your eye. It could very from print to print. I usually just add a few inches on the sides.
User avatar
Mention
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 999
Joined: Tue Feb 24, 2009 12:50 pm
Location: The NW
"The secret to creativity is knowing how to hide your sources." - Albert Einstein

Postby mazdog on Thu Jun 23, 2011 3:03 pm

Those numbers sound good to me.
For something smallish, I'd go with at least an inch around the piece, something larger (24x36) would definitely look weird with only an inch so something in the 2+ range would be good.
User avatar
mazdog
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1318
Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2010 2:43 pm
Location: AZ
Image

Postby FramerDave on Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:01 pm

mazdog wrote:yes if you get it too wet, you could conceivably get the print paper too wet.............having said that, you would have to be pretty out of it to wet the hinge that much and then apply it to print.

I highly recommend messing around with hinging paper on some scrape material first, you will quickly get an idea of how much water is not enough and what would obviously be to much. The amount needed to properly wet the adhesive is far from enough to do any damage.

Edit....just to be clear, I am talking about using the Hayaku pre-gummed Japanese Hinging Paper from Lineco. I think using wheat starch and mulberry paper, could be a considerably trickier endeavor.....


Absolutely correct, the biggest danger is using too much paste on the hinge and applying it to the artwork too wet. The paper will absorb the moisture and cockle. Not quite the end of the world, but it's certainly unsightly.

When I'm hinging I always place the hinges on a small piece of cotton matboard when I apply the paste. It acts as a blotter, soaking up excess moisture. Then I wait a few moments for the paste to start drying out a little; when it no longer looks wet and glistening, then it's ready to go on the art. How long this takes will depend on how wet your paste is, temperature, humidity, the phase of the moon and how you stick your tingue out while doing it. Usually a minute at most.

Once you apply the hinge you still have to control moisture very carefully by placing a clean blotter (another piece of cotton mat) on top of the hing and then gently press on it to wick up the moisture. Once you've done this a few times place yet another clean blotter on it, place a weight on it (just a few ounces) and then leave it alone for about an hour. The blotter will help dry the hinge while the weight keeps it flat and prevents cockling. As the FrameTek site suggests, practice on some magazine and newspaper pages first. When you can hinge them with no problems you're good to go.

By the way, I rarely use the Pellon between the hinge and blotter. I figure that if your blotter is sticking, it's a sign you've used too much paste.
User avatar
FramerDave
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 355
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:25 pm
Location: Houston

Postby sixstringer on Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:06 pm

FramerDave -

When I get to the stage that I have my print mounted on the pedestal foam core how do I attach that to the backing material and get it nice and straight within the frame? Seems like if I used ATG tape I wouldn't be able to move it around for positioning.
User avatar
sixstringer
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 6613
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:29 pm

Postby FramerDave on Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:15 pm

sixstringer wrote:FramerDave -

When I get to the stage that I have my print mounted on the pedestal foam core how do I attach that to the backing material and get it nice and straight within the frame? Seems like if I used ATG tape I wouldn't be able to move it around for positioning.


You're right, and I NEVER trust ATG to hold for the long term. I've seen it turn gummy, ooze and give way too many times. Depending on how much preservation you want, you could use PVA (it's pretty much Elmer's white glue) or some leftover starch paste from your hinging. It doesn't take a lot, so no need to slather all over the place. Just dots of it. That way the whole thing sort of "floats" on the dots of glue until you get it where you want and apply a little bit of pressure. If you'd like, go ahead and use a few bits of ATG as well. That way you won't have to wait for the glue to dry to carry on the frame job.

By the way, there's still some doubts in the minds of conservators about foam board. There is some concern over its long term stability and how that might affect artwork in the years to come. So if you have something you REALLY want to keep in good condition, use something like 8-ply matboard instead. Yes, I know it costs more...
User avatar
FramerDave
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 355
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:25 pm
Location: Houston

Postby sixstringer on Thu Jun 23, 2011 6:16 pm

Thanks...I have yet to buy any supplies so that's some good info.
User avatar
sixstringer
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 6613
Joined: Sun Aug 01, 2010 1:29 pm

Postby CrustaR on Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:31 pm

Cool, FramerDave. This is good info. Appreciate it.
User avatar
CrustaR
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 4172
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 6:34 pm
Location: Austin, TX
pewter14 wrote:You're not the only one on the hunt for The Thing ... just ... the most obvious ... by a lot.

Postby FramerDave on Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:21 pm

CrustaR wrote:Cool, FramerDave. This is good info. Appreciate it.


My pleasure. The Grumble is fun and all, but it's fun to have other outlets too.

And not that I have a filthy mouth but it's nice that I can say crap and dude here. Can't I? Sometimes they're very useful words.
User avatar
FramerDave
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 355
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:25 pm
Location: Houston

Postby Cbjornson on Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:24 pm

FramerDave wrote:
CrustaR wrote:Cool, FramerDave. This is good info. Appreciate it.


My pleasure. The Grumble is fun and all, but it's fun to have other outlets too.

And not that I have a filthy mouth but it's nice that I can say crap and dude here. Can't I? Sometimes they're very useful words.



you should type the f-word for some real drymounting fun.
User avatar
Cbjornson
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1635
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 5:05 pm
Location: NoDak
maden wrote:Never apologize on the internet.

gonzo303 wrote:This is Gonzos mom

Postby Vid1286 on Sat Jun 25, 2011 12:31 pm

[quote="FramerDave... How long this takes will depend on how wet your paste is, temperature, humidity, the phase of the moon and how you stick your tingue out while doing it. Usually a minute at most.

...[/quote]

That's in dry conditions... sometimes during humid weather you have to wait quite a bit longer... maybe up to five minutes.
Vid1286
Art Enthusiast
 
Status: Active
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Jun 22, 2011 4:35 am
Location: South Bend, IN

Postby FramerDave on Sat Jun 25, 2011 5:30 pm

Vid1286 wrote:[quote="FramerDave... How long this takes will depend on how wet your paste is, temperature, humidity, the phase of the moon and how you stick your tingue out while doing it. Usually a minute at most.

...


That's in dry conditions... sometimes during humid weather you have to wait quite a bit longer... maybe up to five minutes.[/quote]

Possibly. Like I said, it depends on a lot of factors. I've also seen a really wide range of how wet different framers make their paste, ranging from runny and the consistency of heavy cream to something resembling tapioca pudding.

I did some hinging one time when I was in Denver and the hinges were almost too dry before I could even get them on the artwork.
User avatar
FramerDave
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 355
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:25 pm
Location: Houston

PreviousNext

Return to Framing Corner



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest