Floating a Print

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.

Postby mistersmith on Wed May 09, 2012 5:37 pm

haven wrote:That's Chris, the very first posts in this thread.


Hey I said I was unclear...word. Guess I proved it!

That's what happens when someone starts a "floating questions" thread every four months for years and years. :)
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electrachrome, mostly kidding wrote:mr smith, EB's poet laureate.


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Postby churdiales on Wed May 09, 2012 5:48 pm

mistersmith wrote:
haven wrote:That's Chris, the very first posts in this thread.


Hey I said I was unclear...word. Guess I proved it!

That's what happens when someone starts a "floating questions" thread every four months for years and years. :)


This is super funny... haven is like that kid in high school that knows all the answers but nobody listens to; this happens to me all the time, EB threads are like a deja vu you recurrently have (is that redundant? I think it is). You're like, what?!!! We've seen this before...

Haven... :notworthy:
And CHRIS... double :notworthy: :notworthy:
And mistersmith, I still owe you a print (and a hug).
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krisjay wrote:I find this post odd.

Postby mycrospazm on Thu May 10, 2012 12:53 am

I think I'm going to practice on some cheap prints because this Saber flag is not cheap to have floated professionally...anyone float a Saber Rebels Flag themselves? Curious as to what I should expect and prepare for.
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Postby jwoods on Thu May 10, 2012 1:04 am

mycrospazm wrote:I think I'm going to practice on some cheap prints because this Saber flag is not cheap to have floated professionally...anyone float a Saber Rebels Flag themselves? Curious as to what I should expect and prepare for.


That paper is way to fragile, I have mine framed up by a professional but it did cost me an arm and a leg
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mcnail wrote:Perhaps you should find a new hobby. I hear pogs are coming back.

Postby mycrospazm on Thu May 10, 2012 2:03 am

I was thinking the same thing about the paper...the handmade nature of it gives me anxiety when handling.
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Postby jwoods on Thu May 10, 2012 2:09 am

I really didnt want to bother with it
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mcnail wrote:Perhaps you should find a new hobby. I hear pogs are coming back.

Postby cccp80over on Fri Jun 01, 2012 1:49 pm

So where does everybody buy their mulberry paper?
I'm anxious to try this "true conservation" technique but not sure where to get the paper and the starch.

EDIT:
I found a lot of GUMMED Hayaku paper like this:
http://www.framing4yourself.com/shop/pr ... ing-paper/

Is this stuff any good?
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Postby cccp80over on Fri Jun 01, 2012 3:39 pm

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Postby beerotan on Fri Jun 01, 2012 3:45 pm

cccp80over wrote:So where does everybody buy their mulberry paper?
I'm anxious to try this "true conservation" technique but not sure where to get the paper and the starch.

EDIT:
I found a lot of GUMMED Hayaku paper like this:
http://www.framing4yourself.com/shop/pr ... ing-paper/

Is this stuff any good?


I posted a similar question on the last page, and ended up getting what misterwhisper recommends in the post below on ebay for less than $25 shipped. Going to try it out this weekend.

misterwhisper wrote:I use a lot of lineco stuff but for hinging and floating i skip those. I don't trust gummed adhesives to be archival and truly water-reversible; they tend to have additional chemicals in them for the gumming process and at the very least will probably leave a residue. Plus the hinging paper should always be the weakest link in the hinging process, which is one of the reasons hand-torn mulberry paper is used -- in a worst-case scenario, you always want the hinge to rip before the art. Of course, I may be wrong and those strips may be completely acceptable, so I'm curious as to what CHR1S will have to say about them.

When floating prints, this lineco kit is what I use instead of those above. Professional, archival quality and everything you need in kit form, easy to use, plus directions on how to make the wheat starch in the microwave in 30 seconds or less.

http://www.dickblick.com/products/linec ... nting-kit/
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Postby cccp80over on Fri Jun 01, 2012 5:31 pm

beerotan wrote:
I posted a similar question on the last page, and ended up getting what misterwhisper recommends in the post below on ebay for less than $25 shipped. Going to try it out this weekend.



Please, post your results later
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Postby FramerDave on Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:10 pm

misterwhisper wrote:
beerotan wrote:Awesome, thanks. I think the only thing holding me back from trying CHR1S' method is the having to stand there and stir wheat paste for 30min straight....


I made a small amount in the microwave for a little print last week. Took 15 seconds total (they recommend stopping and stirring every 10 seconds, but I made so little that I stirred every 5), then strained it through cheesecloth, and it worked great. Squeezing it through the cheesecloth was a little messy though.

summoner wrote:It's the reversal I am worried about honestly, but I think just wetting the fabric enough to activate the glue again should be fine for the paper.


Properly done, wheat starch past is completely reversible; however if you ever need to re-mount your artwork for any reason, you may want to simply cut the old hinges, leave the cut hinges attached, and adhere the new ones over the remnants of the old. This is especially true if you're unsure of the previous framer's method of hinging.


This, this, and this.

The little appliances and stuff may be cool, but unless you're whipping up a huge batch of paste or making some really good custard, it's overkill.

One part rice starch powder, five parts filtered bottled (not distilled) water, mix well. Nuke for ten seconds, stir. Nuke, stir, repeat. Allow it to come to a boil multiple times until it it the consistency of heavy cream. When it cools it will thicken and it will look like... um... well, guys will know what I'm talking about and we'll leave it at that.

If you strain it through a piece of silkscreen material it will be beautifully smooth and lump-free.
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Postby beerotan on Fri Jun 01, 2012 7:11 pm

cccp80over wrote:
beerotan wrote:
I posted a similar question on the last page, and ended up getting what misterwhisper recommends in the post below on ebay for less than $25 shipped. Going to try it out this weekend.



Please, post your results later


I sure will. And actually it looks like I will have to wait until next week, the mat board I'm using for that frame job won't be delivered until Monday. :(
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Postby misterwhisper on Fri Jun 01, 2012 9:00 pm

cccp80over wrote:Please, post your results later


Here's a little piece I mounted using the Lineco Museum Mounting kit. The mounting process turned out great: the mulberry paper tore and feathered nicely (and I didn't even need to paint it with water like I used to), the microwaved wheat starch adhered firmly to the print with no oversaturation and no rippling, and only a tiny amount of paste was needed -- the art is supported by two 1/2" wide pendant hinges on top, and held by two more 1/2" hinges on the bottom sides. The artwork is secured strongly to the pedestal with only about 1/8" of each hinge actually adhered to the artwork (it's floated on a 3/16" pedestal; unfortunately it's hard to see the floating effect b/c the flash washed out the shadows and flattened it out).

IMG_1211.JPG
with flash
IMG_1211.JPG (62.94 KiB) Viewed 669 times

IMG_1222.JPG
no flash
IMG_1222.JPG (53.1 KiB) Viewed 669 times


Unfortunately I didn't take any photos of the actual mounting process using the Lineco kit; hopefully beerotan can do so once his mats come in. But the kit is really easy to use and so far I've been very happy with the results, and there's probably enough paste and paper left over to mount dozens and dozens of prints.
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Postby cccp80over on Sat Jun 02, 2012 10:28 am

misterwhisper,
thank you so much for your comments. Yeah, don't worry about the pictures - it's pretty hard to see the floating effect unless you really get up close :D

Edit: actually, if I look closely at your second pic - there is a subtle shadow from the print visible on the right side...
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Postby codefish on Mon Jun 11, 2012 8:40 pm

Had a lot of help from the very generous Chris, and here's the result. My first DIY frame job:

rsz_dsc_0962.jpg
rsz_dsc_0962.jpg (143.95 KiB) Viewed 572 times


Not a perfect first try, but not bad I guess.
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