Framing Help/Advice Thread

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.

Postby jjbehren on Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:23 am

iambillyg wrote:Thanks for this recommendation. I just framed and hung something this weekend, and it fell/shattered within 20 minutes.


I just picked up a couple packs of THESE locking security hangers. I haven't got a chance to use them, though, because I didn't get a wrench with my set. But they look good.
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Postby Vonschinkel on Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:38 am

http://wallbuddies.com/

I've been using these for any large piece and they are rock solid. Super easy to get on the wall and once up there feels very secure. Also incredibly easy to level and the price point is great. Used them for years without any problems.

----

For smaller pieces I just use good old picture wire and these wall hangers. No problem with these either:

https://www.ziabicki.com/deluxe-floreat-hangers/30-lb

Read about them here:

http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-picture-hangers/
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Postby iambillyg on Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:38 pm

shredkeenan wrote:
iambillyg wrote:Thanks for this recommendation. I just framed and hung something this weekend, and it fell/shattered within 20 minutes.


Ouch, my condolences. On a nail I assume?

On something like this, but with only one needle:

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Postby jjbehren on Mon Apr 13, 2015 12:58 pm

Wall Buddies are great, but they don't lock the piece on. I have kids that throw fudge around all the time. For the really valuable/irreplaceable stuff, I want something that locks on and won't fall off.
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Postby misterwhisper on Mon Apr 13, 2015 4:18 pm

jjbehren wrote:
iambillyg wrote:Thanks for this recommendation. I just framed and hung something this weekend, and it fell/shattered within 20 minutes.


I just picked up a couple packs of THESE locking security hangers. I haven't got a chance to use them, though, because I didn't get a wrench with my set. But they look good.


I have this exact set (mine did come with the wrench though). A lot of measuring involved (next time I'm making a kraft paper template first) and it really helps if you have a laser level, but once it's up and level it stays that way. Good stuff. :pint:
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Postby mistersmith on Mon Apr 13, 2015 4:55 pm

alteridiom wrote:I'm hanging my first picture frame that has some substantial weight to it. I've always just used a nail in the wall but don't feel safe for this. What are you guys using? Something like this:


Do you own the home, or does nobody care about holes you'd make? And is it not a brick wall? Drive a screw into a stud, problem solved. If it's brick, drive a screw into the brick.

jjbehren wrote:I love the strips for a couple of reasons. First, you can trim them down so there is almost no overlap into the image area when adhering the strips to the backing board.


I've trimmed corners before. Cut a notch out of the front side of the corner, so the adhesive side is still a triangle, but the front side of the pocket is now L-shaped. That's worked. Strips I've always found to be too bulky.

jjbehren wrote:Here's a tough one.


Hinging to the backing really is the best bet. If you've never done it yourself pay a local framer, but if it's good enough for the Smithsonian it's good enough for me. But it sounds like the paper is a hair too wide for the frame? In that case, slice a hair off of both sides (nobody will ever know).
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Postby CHR1S on Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:17 pm

jjbehren wrote: I could hinge it onto a backing board, but would really rather avoid that if at all possible since, no matter how "archival" Japanese hinges are supposed to be, I'm not a fan of sticking anything directly to the artwork.
Any suggestions?


Despite your hesitation I still suggest Japanese mulberry paper and wheat paste. There's a reason it's the standard method used by museums and the most reputable framers. Want to know how reversible it is? Watch the short video I made below:

I first cut the hinges and what you see here is the small piece of Japanese mulberry paper that is still adhered (with wheat paste) to the back of a print. I use a damp Q-tip to dissolve the wheat paste and the mulberry paper is removed leaving absolutely no trace behind. There is absolutely no loss of paper and no marks left behind. In the end I us a piece of blotter paper to absorb any moisture or dampness.






https://vimeo.com/103246222
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Postby tankpig on Wed Apr 15, 2015 3:09 pm

In talks with a framer for tyler stouts thing reg...

Got sent these so far but still in talks of what to do i think we've started in a good place though!

Fabric covered mat with blood splats inbetween two white mats to give a snowy sort of feel to the print.

Image

Image

Image

I got back to him though as I do want the moulding to be an off-white as opposed to bright as its going on a white wall!

Thoughts or ideas guys? MUCH appreciated :D
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Postby ToolFanFromWayBack on Wed Apr 15, 2015 4:23 pm

I like the mats - the blood spatter is a pretty cool. Have you thought of trying a black frame? It might make the print pop even more on a white wall.
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Postby Halo97 on Fri Apr 17, 2015 1:26 pm

I built a custom frame for an 18x24 Obey print. The viewable area is exactly 18x24. I plan to use spacers but no top mat (or is it bottom?). Would the best way to mount the print be to float it to a matting or suing archival tape, tape it to a piece of acid free foamcore? Please be gentle. :shock:
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Postby misterwhisper on Fri Apr 17, 2015 2:47 pm

If the viewable area is exactly the same size as the print so that the edges are visible, use mulberry hinges & wheat paste (no tape of any kind on the print ever) a la CHR1S's post. If the frame's edge overlaps the print's edge like a standard frame (there's usually about a 1/8 inch overlap) you can trim photo corners like mistersmith suggests above, just keep them small enough to be hidden by the overlap.
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Postby Halo97 on Tue Apr 21, 2015 12:03 pm

misterwhisper wrote:If the viewable area is exactly the same size as the print so that the edges are visible, use mulberry hinges & wheat paste (no tape of any kind on the print ever) a la CHR1S's post. If the frame's edge overlaps the print's edge like a standard frame (there's usually about a 1/8 inch overlap) you can trim photo corners like mistersmith suggests above, just keep them small enough to be hidden by the overlap.


Thank you so much. I thought I had compensated enough that the entire print would be visible but thanks to my inability to properly calculate fractions, I saved my self some heartache. I think my viewable is exactly a 1/4" smaller then the print so the corners should hide it.
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Postby MJGallicchio on Thu Aug 06, 2015 9:50 am

I was wondering if anyone had any ideas about "archival" ways of framing something that is easy to swap out. I have 2 frames that I use to rotate my JLU's through. I already upgraded the glass to UV protective glass, but I was thinking of adding spacers and acid free backing. My question/issue is that I'm not sure how to secure. I usually use points and craft paper to seal up my prints, but that would make it kind of a PITA to change prints. I don't need true archival standards, I just want to protect my prints as best as possible while they're on the wall.

Any ideas?
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Postby emac on Fri Aug 07, 2015 11:59 am

Use flexible points (so you can bend them back and forth to swap things out) and no dust cover.

If you need to use a new piece of foam core every time for mounting (because the pieces can't use the same corners placement), that's a small investment to make. :)
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Postby electrachrome on Fri Aug 07, 2015 1:47 pm

shredkeenan wrote:
ColonelCash wrote:I'm looking for a decent frame for an 18x24 print. Does anyone have examples from American Frame? Looking for a white mat, black frame, UV glass. Nothing special. Went to a shop in Nashville and those posterkillers wanted $438+tax for it. Told them to sit and spin.


For a standard size like that and a "nothing fancy" black frame, your cheapest option is probably going to be buying a pre-made 22x28 black frame from Aaron Brothers (with 50% off coupon of course), trashing the glass and backing that comes with it, and then buying UV glass, foamcore and a mat from Hobby Lobby. You can use 40% off coupons on the glass at Hobby Lobby. I don't recommend the pre-made frames from Michaels or Hobby Lobby - the Aaron Brothers ones are much better quality.

When you order the mat, you'll want 22x28 with 17.5x23.5 window opening, which means you have 2.25" of mat all the way around and 1/4" overlap onto the print (this may warrant adjustment depending on the print).

American Frame wouldn't cost much more, but you're going to pay more for the frame (because it's still "custom"), and a little less for the mat. You'll have to get the glass locally anyway as AF will only ship acrylic.

If you're curious about any of AF's offerings, you can order samples of any of their frames and mats. They used to send you 5 free before your first order.

If you go my suggested route, it will cost you under $75.


here is a basic build template from Frame Destination. Frame size is 22"x28". Matt window is 17"x23" (1/2 overlap each side). Everything is 100% archival. All you need in addition is mounting strips or corners (I recommend Lineco). Total before shipping is $94.

11224477_10206257833598684_7262342157547435961_n.jpg
11224477_10206257833598684_7262342157547435961_n.jpg (48.3 KiB) Viewed 3506 times
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