Framing Help/Advice Thread

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.

Postby Sithlord32 on Fri Mar 06, 2015 8:11 pm

Drew its never a good idea to have the art in contact with the glazing. Highly recommend spacers.

allyouzombies Different sized hooks are rated for weight. Acrylic is pretty light in comparison to glass go with a 40lb rated hook and you'll be fine. If you don't like the single hook and wire you can get wall buddies that attach to the frame one in each corner.
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Postby Tazgarde on Fri Mar 06, 2015 8:12 pm

allyouzombies wrote:Newb question here. I just got some landscape prints framed (Stout LTROI and Moss Lawrence of Arabia) and I want to hang them. Are two hooks necessary for prints this size, or would one do the job?


Go for two. Better safe than sorry. The last thing you want is your print falling off the wall.
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Postby KSUvet on Fri Mar 06, 2015 8:39 pm

Tazgarde wrote:
allyouzombies wrote:Newb question here. I just got some landscape prints framed (Stout LTROI and Moss Lawrence of Arabia) and I want to hang them. Are two hooks necessary for prints this size, or would one do the job?


Go for two. Better safe than sorry. The last thing you want is your print falling off the wall.

It also helps keep them from tilting.
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Postby Sithlord32 on Fri Mar 06, 2015 8:42 pm

Tazgarde wrote:
allyouzombies wrote:Newb question here. I just got some landscape prints framed (Stout LTROI and Moss Lawrence of Arabia) and I want to hang them. Are two hooks necessary for prints this size, or would one do the job?


Go for two. Better safe than sorry. The last thing you want is your print falling off the wall.


See my above post for a more accurate answer and solution. Not to take the wind out of your sails but two hooks is not necessary and will cause more issues than its worth. The frame isnt going to want to hang perfectly straight unless both hooks are placed perfectly level. Your also putting more holes in your wall than necessary. If you place the hook side by side your running the risk of the two holes weakening the drywall because they are too close which will cause it to still fall off the wall and leave you with a chunk or wall that needs repair as well.

The single hook rated for your frame weight is all you need. Also dont forget to use rubber bumpers on the bottom rear corners. It will help it stay straight and not tilt nor scratch your wall and helps prevent dust and dirt build up around the frame creating ugly shadows by leaving airspace behind the frame.

The majority of my prints are about that size with both arylic and museum glass and ive never had a frame tilt bad or fall of the wall.
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Postby allyouzombies on Sat Mar 07, 2015 11:29 am

Sithlord32 wrote:
Tazgarde wrote:
allyouzombies wrote:Newb question here. I just got some landscape prints framed (Stout LTROI and Moss Lawrence of Arabia) and I want to hang them. Are two hooks necessary for prints this size, or would one do the job?


Go for two. Better safe than sorry. The last thing you want is your print falling off the wall.


See my above post for a more accurate answer and solution. Not to take the wind out of your sails but two hooks is not necessary and will cause more issues than its worth. The frame isnt going to want to hang perfectly straight unless both hooks are placed perfectly level. Your also putting more holes in your wall than necessary. If you place the hook side by side your running the risk of the two holes weakening the drywall because they are too close which will cause it to still fall off the wall and leave you with a chunk or wall that needs repair as well.

The single hook rated for your frame weight is all you need. Also dont forget to use rubber bumpers on the bottom rear corners. It will help it stay straight and not tilt nor scratch your wall and helps prevent dust and dirt build up around the frame creating ugly shadows by leaving airspace behind the frame.

The majority of my prints are about that size with both arylic and museum glass and ive never had a frame tilt bad or fall of the wall.


Thanks for the feedback everybody. I went with two hooks for the Moss print, and while it worked, it was definitely a bitch to get to hang level. Gonna go with 1 hook for the Stout and see what happens.
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Postby jesterguy on Sun Mar 22, 2015 2:42 am

Was looking for some advice. I have a few pieces I'd like to hang, however I don't know which way to go about it. I guess the easiest way to think about it is a shadowbox. So there's a wooden box and the piece is mounted on two blocks attached to the wood backing, it basically looks like it's floated just done in a more rudimentary way. There are no hooks or anything on the back and I don't want to drill into the "frame" part. So is there a simple way to hang these without permanently attaching something to the back of the frame by way of drilling or gluing?
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Postby shredkeenan on Sun Mar 22, 2015 9:13 am

jesterguy wrote:Was looking for some advice. I have a few pieces I'd like to hang, however I don't know which way to go about it. I guess the easiest way to think about it is a shadowbox. So there's a wooden box and the piece is mounted on two blocks attached to the wood backing, it basically looks like it's floated just done in a more rudimentary way. There are no hooks or anything on the back and I don't want to drill into the "frame" part. So is there a simple way to hang these without permanently attaching something to the back of the frame by way of drilling or gluing?


I don't think there are any "non-permanent" way to attach hanging hardware that wouldn't also mean a high risk of the piece falling off the wall someday. What is your concern about drilling into the piece?

If you really don't want to, I would suggest mounting a narrow floating shelf with a lip (see below), and just setting them on it.

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Postby jesterguy on Sun Mar 22, 2015 2:04 pm

shredkeenan wrote:
jesterguy wrote:Was looking for some advice. I have a few pieces I'd like to hang, however I don't know which way to go about it. I guess the easiest way to think about it is a shadowbox. So there's a wooden box and the piece is mounted on two blocks attached to the wood backing, it basically looks like it's floated just done in a more rudimentary way. There are no hooks or anything on the back and I don't want to drill into the "frame" part. So is there a simple way to hang these without permanently attaching something to the back of the frame by way of drilling or gluing?


I don't think there are any "non-permanent" way to attach hanging hardware that wouldn't also mean a high risk of the piece falling off the wall someday. What is your concern about drilling into the piece?

If you really don't want to, I would suggest mounting a narrow floating shelf with a lip (see below), and just setting them on it.

[img]http://woodform.com/site/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/774-00-773-00-Modern-Ledge.jpg[img]


Mostly I'm concerned about damaging it, the frame area is pretty small so there's little room for error and I don't trust myself :) Also I'd have to use a pretty short screw since it's fairly shallow and I don't want to split the wood if I drill into it. The shelves might work though, I'll have to prop some up to see how they look and it's super easy plus I have some laying around.

I was also thinking about using plate hangers like these:

http://www.containerstore.com/shop/coll ... d=10010750

There's a Container Store basically within eyesight of my house so I might swing by and check them out. The only thing I'm worried about with those is if I need to remove them I cannot soak them off, obviously. I might just buy one and stick it to a piece of wood for a week and see how tough it is to remove if I needed to down the road. I've got enough room on the back to use the largest disc and the 5 1/2 lbs. capacity should be plenty and it will be completely hidden which is nice.

And my last thought was just using small brackets top and bottom screwed into the wall and just slide the piece in from the side. I'm sure I can find one that barely overhangs on the front and I can get one so that the hardware is behind the piece like this:

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Postby alteridiom on Wed Apr 08, 2015 5:01 pm

I'm hanging my first picture frame that has some substantial weight to it. I've always just used a nail in the wall but don't feel safe for this. What are you guys using? Something like this:
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Postby summoner on Wed Apr 08, 2015 5:03 pm

alteridiom wrote:I'm hanging my first picture frame that has some substantial weight to it. I've always just used a nail in the wall but don't feel safe for this. What are you guys using? Something like this:
Image

Ive used those, and they work great.
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Postby jjbehren on Sun Apr 12, 2015 9:54 am

Mounting strips vs. corners:

Seems like most people prefer the corners. I'm wondering if there's a reason for that. I love the strips for a couple of reasons. First, you can trim them down so there is almost no overlap into the image area when adhering the strips to the backing board. Second, depending on the piece, you can actually adhere them to the mat, rather than the backing board, so that there is no overlap on the image side of the print. The latter way is not great with a lot of pieces since it doesn't provide a lot of support to the piece, but it works alright if you're framing something that's pretty small and rigid.

I cut the strips down to about 3/4" sections and use 2-3 per side, depending on the size of the piece.

Opinions on strips vs. corners?
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Postby Baker on Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:31 am

alteridiom wrote:I'm hanging my first picture frame that has some substantial weight to it. I've always just used a nail in the wall but don't feel safe for this. What are you guys using? Something like this:
Image


Yup, I use one of the 3 pin ones for my nesting which is hefty, never have had a problem with it.
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Postby iambillyg on Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:47 am

Thanks for this recommendation. I just framed and hung something this weekend, and it fell/shattered within 20 minutes.
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Postby shredkeenan on Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:07 am

iambillyg wrote:Thanks for this recommendation. I just framed and hung something this weekend, and it fell/shattered within 20 minutes.


Ouch, my condolences. On a nail I assume?
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Postby jjbehren on Mon Apr 13, 2015 11:18 am

Here's a tough one.

I have a frame that I really want to use for a certain piece. The opening in the frame is almost perfect for the piece with no mat. The problem being "almost". It's perfect height wise, but the opening is just a hair too wide, maybe 1/8" overall. I can get the piece to actually touch the side rabbets, but the overlap is almost immeasurable, like 1/64" or something. It would probably look fine if I could get it in there, but it's a valuable piece ($700+), and don't want to risk it shifting just a fraction of an inch either way and popping out.

I thought about routing out the rabbet so I could mount the piece to a backing board, but retain the opening as-is and but spacers all around the opening. It's a custom-made, wide frame so there's enough material to work with. But it's also made of old barn wood and I'm not sure the wood could take the routing without splintering (no experience with this, just my instinct - it's very splintery wood). I could hinge it onto a backing board, but would really rather avoid that if at all possible since, no matter how "archival" Japanese hinges are supposed to be, I'm not a fan of sticking anything directly to the artwork. I also thought about getting wide spacers (if they make such a thing), thus effectively extending the rabbet's surface area, but then the spacers would show a bit. If I got black ones it might actually look pretty cool (piece is predominately black on white paper), but I still have the problem of the print being able to slide side to side a bit. And most likely the adhesive side of the spacer would have to face out, right? Maybe I can get the tallest spacers and turn them on their side and stick them to the rise of the rabbet? I might still need a very narrow strip of wood in there to fill the gap between the rabbet and the spacer, though.

Any suggestions?
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