Framing Help/Advice Thread

Share your pictures of framed art and discuss framing.

Postby MJGallicchio on Mon Aug 10, 2015 9:39 am

emac wrote:Use flexible points (so you can bend them back and forth to swap things out) and no dust cover.

If you need to use a new piece of foam core every time for mounting (because the pieces can't use the same corners placement), that's a small investment to make. :)


Thanks emac! I picked up some flexible points this weekend and they worked perfect.

Next question. I made my first attempt at cutting my own mats over the weekend. The guide that came with the cutter suggested using pencil to draw guides for cutting. I was nervous about the pencil transferring to the print, so I lightly scored the mat with an exacto knife instead. Any other suggestions?

Sorry for all of the questions, but the person I trusted at Michaels recently left and the more time I spend there and HL talking to their framers, the less I want to leave them in charge of my prints, so until I find a reasonably priced local framer that does good work it seems like I'm on my own.
User avatar
MJGallicchio
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1474
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:35 pm
Location: In between NYC and Boston

Postby emac on Mon Aug 10, 2015 10:51 am

MJGallicchio wrote:
emac wrote:Use flexible points (so you can bend them back and forth to swap things out) and no dust cover.

If you need to use a new piece of foam core every time for mounting (because the pieces can't use the same corners placement), that's a small investment to make. :)


Thanks emac! I picked up some flexible points this weekend and they worked perfect.

Next question. I made my first attempt at cutting my own mats over the weekend. The guide that came with the cutter suggested using pencil to draw guides for cutting. I was nervous about the pencil transferring to the print, so I lightly scored the mat with an exacto knife instead. Any other suggestions?

Sorry for all of the questions, but the person I trusted at Michaels recently left and the more time I spend there and HL talking to their framers, the less I want to leave them in charge of my prints, so until I find a reasonably priced local framer that does good work it seems like I'm on my own.


Your stuff turned out great! And I've never had an issue with the pencil transferring in the years that I've been matting my own stuff, but it's a fair point to think about. I would suggest getting an artist's eraser (ArtGum or kneaded rubber would be my suggestions) and just carefully erasing the remaining lead lines after you cut the mat. You shouldn't be pushing very hard to draw the lines anyway -- they're guidelines after all :)
emac
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 5101
Joined: Thu Oct 22, 2009 3:10 pm
ImageImageImageImageImage

Postby MJGallicchio on Mon Aug 10, 2015 11:09 am

emac wrote:
MJGallicchio wrote:
emac wrote:Use flexible points (so you can bend them back and forth to swap things out) and no dust cover.

If you need to use a new piece of foam core every time for mounting (because the pieces can't use the same corners placement), that's a small investment to make. :)


Thanks emac! I picked up some flexible points this weekend and they worked perfect.

Next question. I made my first attempt at cutting my own mats over the weekend. The guide that came with the cutter suggested using pencil to draw guides for cutting. I was nervous about the pencil transferring to the print, so I lightly scored the mat with an exacto knife instead. Any other suggestions?

Sorry for all of the questions, but the person I trusted at Michaels recently left and the more time I spend there and HL talking to their framers, the less I want to leave them in charge of my prints, so until I find a reasonably priced local framer that does good work it seems like I'm on my own.


Your stuff turned out great! And I've never had an issue with the pencil transferring in the years that I've been matting my own stuff, but it's a fair point to think about. I would suggest getting an artist's eraser (ArtGum or kneaded rubber would be my suggestions) and just carefully erasing the remaining lead lines after you cut the mat. You shouldn't be pushing very hard to draw the lines anyway -- they're guidelines after all :)



Perfect. Thanks again. I have 6 bigger & more valueable pieces that I think I'm going to do myself in the coming weeks/months, so I figured I'd practice on some of my smaller pieces and work out the kinks. I'm excited with out they turned out, my wife was shocked that I was able to do it myself, the inlaws are pretty pumped that the mat cutter they bought me 2 years ago is finally being used, and I was able to get more art on the walls without breaking the bank. Win/Win/Win/WIn.
User avatar
MJGallicchio
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1474
Joined: Tue Apr 24, 2012 10:35 pm
Location: In between NYC and Boston

Postby gogitchershinebox on Tue Sep 08, 2015 6:43 pm

I've perused this thread and haven't seen anything on this, so I hope I'm not repeating something answered elsewhere. I need recommendations on a source that will ship lengths of finished wood moulding to individual hobbyists. I've found several wholesalers, but I'm not a shop -- just a dude who wants to build his own frames. Ideally, I'd like to get a selection of black wood mouldings in a few different styles, rabbets already cut, in something like 9 or 18 foot strips (cut down for shipping in the US).

I've been buying frames from AF and Frame Destination for years, but now I want to get moulding and build my own frames. Can anyone suggest a good supplier? Alternatively, I could circumvent shipping altogether if there is one near me (Gainesville, FL). Many thanks!
User avatar
gogitchershinebox
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri Jan 16, 2009 9:24 pm

Postby ToolFanFromWayBack on Wed Sep 09, 2015 12:22 am

gogitchershinebox wrote:I've perused this thread and haven't seen anything on this, so I hope I'm not repeating something answered elsewhere. I need recommendations on a source that will ship lengths of finished wood moulding to individual hobbyists. I've found several wholesalers, but I'm not a shop -- just a dude who wants to build his own frames. Ideally, I'd like to get a selection of black wood mouldings in a few different styles, rabbets already cut, in something like 9 or 18 foot strips (cut down for shipping in the US).

I've been buying frames from AF and Frame Destination for years, but now I want to get moulding and build my own frames. Can anyone suggest a good supplier? Alternatively, I could circumvent shipping altogether if there is one near me (Gainesville, FL). Many thanks!


You might check with a local frame shop and see if they would be willing to add your order into their order (assuming they buy sticks and don't farm out the assembly). Your best bet on that would be to get with an independent framer not Michael's or Hobby Lobby. I know for a fact that HL does off site construction so they never get sticks in.

There are a lot of sites that will sell direct to you (usually in 3-5 foot sticks) with a minimum of like 60 linear feet. Keep in mind if you want longer (8' and longer) you will likely have to ship freight. This is not a recommendation, just the first site google returned - http://www.framing4yourself.com/shop/pr ... s-lengths/ will sell in 3', 4' or 5' sticks.
User avatar
ToolFanFromWayBack
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 4911
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 2:05 am
Location: Houston, TX
I need more. Nothing seems to satisfy. I don't want it. I just need it. To feel, to breathe, to know I'm alive. - MJK
“People incapable of guilt usually have a good time.” - Rust Cohle
Presenting Codeblue's 30000th post -
Codeblue wrote:bump

Postby FramerDave on Mon Sep 14, 2015 3:04 pm

I'd go with Tool's advice. This way you avoid all the hassles of shipping and the costs, you get to check out the moulding in person before buying, and you'll get a much larger selection. A fair frame shop will sell it to you at a markup to cover their time but it will be a lot less than if you were to buy a finished, cut and joined frame.

By the way, generally moulding comes in sticks a maximum of 10'. If it's made in Europe it will be 3 meters, or 9.8 feet.

If you need a recommendation for a place in Gainesville let me know.
User avatar
FramerDave
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 355
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 1:25 pm
Location: Houston

Postby jayper on Thu Sep 17, 2015 12:59 am

Getting ready to frame up some of my 24x36's and due to wall space limitations, I was planning to use standard 24x36 frames with no matting.

I planned to use:
- spacers
- acid free foam core

My questions:

Should I be mounting the prints to the foam core?
If so, are corners or strips preferred with prints that size?
If corners, how big should they be?

My assumption is that I do not need to use corners or strips. If true, what is the safest way to assemble the frame so that the print doesn't buckle or crease when laying it in on top of the spacers?

Apologies if these questions have already been answered, but I just wanted to talk it out to be sure.

I greatly appreciate the assistance,
Justin
User avatar
jayper
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1523
Joined: Fri Oct 24, 2014 1:02 am

Postby JBFrame on Sat Sep 19, 2015 10:22 pm

jayper wrote:Getting ready to frame up some of my 24x36's and due to wall space limitations, I was planning to use standard 24x36 frames with no matting.

I planned to use:
- spacers
- acid free foam core

My questions:

Should I be mounting the prints to the foam core?
If so, are corners or strips preferred with prints that size?
If corners, how big should they be?

My assumption is that I do not need to use corners or strips. If true, what is the safest way to assemble the frame so that the print doesn't buckle or crease when laying it in on top of the spacers?

Apologies if these questions have already been answered, but I just wanted to talk it out to be sure.

I greatly appreciate the assistance,
Justin


Justin,

Sounds like you have it pretty much together with the spacer & AF foam backing.

This is how I do it in my shop. I make the whole frame exactly 1/8" (1/16" on all sides) larger than the print. Reason for the 1/8" larger instead of 1/4" is the print has to set on the spacer and if you give it more than 1/16" on all sides it will drop in against the glass. If you give it less than the 1/16" on all sides you won't have room for normal expansion and contraction due to the climate causing the print my start bunching up (waving). Personally I like the Econo Space - it is a hollow plastic spacer tube. The reason I like this spacer is because there is a little flex to the spacer because of it being hollow. The solid plastic spacer doesn't flex/give and it may cause the print to be held too tightly causing bunching up (waving) during the expansion and contraction process of paper. Lay the glass inside the frame and carefully measure the spacer cutting all 4 side to fit the glass exactly. Attach the spacer to the glass and burnish the spacer for a good hold. Carefully lay the print onto the adhesive free side of the spacer - remember - no adhesive on the print - the adhesive side of the spacer is stuck to the glass. I then carefully lay the AF foam core onto the print - I do not attach the print, I want the print to have room to expand and contract. I use a point driver to hold the foam core in place, BUT VERY IMPORTANT, place 4 ply mat board spacer between the point driver and the foam core when driving the points. Remove the mat board as you go leaving a little space between the point and the foam core. Using the mat board as a spacer between the foam core and the point driver is to assure that the foam core is not too tight against the print, again the print has to have room to move. I drive points about every 4 to 6 inches. Attach the dust cover and hanging system and you are ready to hang it.

Anyway, this is how I do it in my shop, I'm sure you will get other recommendations which may also work just fine. This is how I do mine and it is tried and true and works nicely if you follow these steps. I hopes this helps.

Joe - JB Picture Framing Studio
User avatar
JBFrame
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 184
Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2014 1:56 pm
Location: Blaine, MN

Postby elroy404 on Mon Oct 05, 2015 12:54 am

Does anyone have experience with standoff bolts and acrylic framing?
I found diy instructions but I was curious if it affects the print at all and how the print stays in place just sandwiched by the plexi without tape.
http://www.huntedinterior.com/2014/02/d ... hH6PxNVhHw
Image
User avatar
elroy404
Art Connoisseur
 
Status: Active
Posts: 133
Joined: Sat Jul 26, 2014 9:26 pm

Postby misterwhisper on Mon Oct 05, 2015 3:25 am

You can always hinge the print to the back sheet of plexi to keep it in place. However, I'd never recommend sandwiching a print between glazing. It's not good for the art.
User avatar
misterwhisper
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 2120
Joined: Fri May 13, 2011 2:56 am

Postby ToolFanFromWayBack on Mon Oct 05, 2015 10:08 pm

misterwhisper wrote:You can always hinge the print to the back sheet of plexi to keep it in place. However, I'd never recommend sandwiching a print between glazing. It's not good for the art.


Agreed on not using the sandwich method. Any moisture gets in there and the ink will be staying on the glass not the paper. I would hinge and put a 1/16 washer between the back glass and front glass at the bolts.
User avatar
ToolFanFromWayBack
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 4911
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2012 2:05 am
Location: Houston, TX
I need more. Nothing seems to satisfy. I don't want it. I just need it. To feel, to breathe, to know I'm alive. - MJK
“People incapable of guilt usually have a good time.” - Rust Cohle
Presenting Codeblue's 30000th post -
Codeblue wrote:bump

Postby benjo09 on Sun Dec 20, 2015 10:06 pm

Just after peoples thoughts on framing a signed print where the signature runs to 1mm the edge of the paper. Its signed in an area where the signature isn't easy to see anyway so I'm thinking if I cut some of it off it won't be the end of the world but I would like to avoid it.

I would like to use a mat I only have experience using the Lineco Archival Mounting strips. Is 1mm enough to work with with these or is there a better solution? I'm not keen on trying to float it as I have no experience.
benjo09
Art Enthusiast
 
Status: Active
Posts: 61
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:03 pm

Postby Sithlord32 on Wed Dec 23, 2015 3:23 pm

benjo09 wrote:Just after peoples thoughts on framing a signed print where the signature runs to 1mm the edge of the paper. Its signed in an area where the signature isn't easy to see anyway so I'm thinking if I cut some of it off it won't be the end of the world but I would like to avoid it.

I would like to use a mat I only have experience using the Lineco Archival Mounting strips. Is 1mm enough to work with with these or is there a better solution? I'm not keen on trying to float it as I have no experience.

No 1mm is not enough for the matting to do its job. I would suggest either matting over the sig or up your skills and try floating on some thick stock paper before making a run at it with your print. Spacers are also going to take up more than 1mm of the edge. Id never recommend cutting the sig off but hey its yours do what works for you.

You could mount it to the backboard and just lay the matting over it if you just want the look of matting. If you did that id recommended some self adhesive corners though the matting might not lay perfectly flat with the corners under it.
User avatar
Sithlord32
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1535
Joined: Thu Feb 06, 2014 6:49 pm
Location: Dathomir
..."one spoon might feel a little nicer, but the cornflakes will taste the same"...Beckett.

Postby sidaldo on Sun Feb 21, 2016 1:36 pm

Some good tips here
User avatar
sidaldo
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 1003
Joined: Fri Mar 08, 2013 3:02 am

Postby iambillyg on Thu Feb 25, 2016 12:12 pm

Does anyone have a source for purchasing colored spacers and deep frames for floating?
User avatar
iambillyg
Art Expert
 
Status: Active
Posts: 9425
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2011 11:14 am
Location: Austin, TX

PreviousNext

Return to Framing Corner



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: JBFrame and 2 guests