Best Brush for Dusting Prints?

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Postby jesseindisguise on Thu Jul 19, 2012 2:56 pm

I want to buy a brush to help remove any faint particles/dust/etc from prints before they go into a frame/prior to shipping. Can anyone suggest a particular brand/brush that would be good for this?

Of course, if there's something better than a brush, I'm all ears. Thanks in advance for your suggestions :pint:
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Postby CHR1S on Thu Jul 19, 2012 8:04 pm

I have a set of Japanese brushes I use for light dusting. I've never used them to dust off a print however. I work in a museum and use these on a weekly basis to dust the frames of paintings we have on display and sculptures that are out on display. On occasion they are used to dust the surfaces of painting as well. I can't imagine that they would be harmful with prints.

See the link below:

http://apps.webcreate.com/ecom/catalog/ ... ctID=20624
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Postby Baker on Thu Jul 19, 2012 11:06 pm

Ive used canned air to blow off prints and glass before framing.
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Postby suchanoo on Fri Jul 20, 2012 2:15 am

I nicked one of my wife's (brand new) make-up powder brushes. Works great.
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Postby 1nkling on Fri Jul 20, 2012 9:18 am

Baker wrote:Ive used canned air to blow off prints and glass before framing.


I'd imagine you need to be really careful that way though.. Some of the cheaper canned air products are known to squirt moisture out too. This usually evaporates quickly but don't know if it would do anything to the print it hit. Wouldn't want to find out either.
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Postby technique on Fri Jul 20, 2012 2:33 pm

I use a horsehair dust brush which you can get at either Michaels or Hobby Lobby for about $3.99
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Postby jesseindisguise on Fri Jul 20, 2012 4:45 pm

Thanks everyone for the helpful tips, I just want to make sure I'm well stocked with the correct tools/etc to take the best possible care of my prints.

Cheers! :pint:
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Postby halftonegraphics on Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:06 pm

technique wrote:I use a horsehair dust brush which you can get at either Michaels or Hobby Lobby for about $3.99


bumpsky.

does this seem to be the best option? in the market and need to pick one up.
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Postby SurfingJeff on Wed Mar 12, 2014 1:36 pm

I think appletree said he uses a Giotto air blaster:

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http://www.amazon.com/Giottos-AA1900-Rocket-Blaster-Large/dp/B00017LSPI

It's delicate enough to be used for cleaning camera lenses, and since it's hand powered, there's no risk of residue like canned air.
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Postby Cragars on Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:45 am

Large puffy makeup brush and some canned air. Short brush strokes to get the particles moving and the canned air to blast them away.

Sort of overkill but whatev
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Postby IWish on Fri Mar 14, 2014 11:54 am

Go to the dollar store and buy one of these.

http://www.dollartree.com/household/cle ... hod=search
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Postby mnelson on Fri Mar 14, 2014 12:46 pm

Yeah, i personally don't trust canned air. That air blaster looks interesting, though
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Postby jimmybing on Thu Mar 20, 2014 11:03 am

CHR1S wrote:I have a set of Japanese brushes I use for light dusting. I've never used them to dust off a print however. I work in a museum and use these on a weekly basis to dust the frames of paintings we have on display and sculptures that are out on display. On occasion they are used to dust the surfaces of painting as well. I can't imagine that they would be harmful with prints.

See the link below:

http://apps.webcreate.com/ecom/catalog/ ... ctID=20624


How soft are the bristles on these?
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