Shipping framed prints

Information on shipping, storing and repairing your art, plus your reviews on products for art collecting, making, storing, etc..

Postby jettad on Wed Jun 04, 2014 10:20 am

Thanks Peacedog, fantastic info. :clap:

Quick question. Are prints that are floated okay to ship framed? Or do they require a different way of packing/shipping?
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Postby soam24 on Wed Jun 04, 2014 10:22 am

Peacedog,

awesome as always! and congrats on the 5 years!

:pint: :pint:
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Postby peacedog on Wed Jun 04, 2014 10:36 am

jettad wrote:Quick question. Are prints that are floated okay to ship framed? Or do they require a different way of packing/shipping?


Not much you can do to secure the piece under the glass. Shipping floated art definitely worries me since a good hit from any direction can loosen the hinges. We much prefer to use a private currier who knows what he's dealing with and can give it the extra care required.
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Postby jettad on Wed Jun 04, 2014 11:02 am

peacedog wrote:
jettad wrote:Quick question. Are prints that are floated okay to ship framed? Or do they require a different way of packing/shipping?


Not much you can do to secure the piece under the glass. Shipping floated art definitely worries me since a good hit from any direction can loosen the hinges. We much prefer to use a private currier who knows what he's dealing with and can give it the extra care required.


Thanks.

So I lied, one more question. Which courier service do you use, any recommendations for within the US and international?

And I just read about the 5 years, congratulations. :clap: :clap:
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Postby phishstix101 on Wed Jun 04, 2014 11:15 am

Bookmarked!
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Postby pewter14 on Thu Jul 24, 2014 3:36 pm

Bump for the move into Art Care forum.

Left a shadow thread over in Framing Corner as well.

Edit ... and yeah, HOLY drymount ... that shipping. Might have to send peacedog a print or 5 to frame.
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Two links every EB member should read, please take a moment:

EB Wiki - How to Ship a Print in a Tube

Expressobeans For Sale Forum - Open Market Guidelines

Postby Baker on Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:40 am

Yeah, the packing out of Furthur is insane. When they shipped me back 4 smaller pieces they framed up for me it came in a giant box packed like an absolute champ. I havnt had to buy bubble wrap since then for packing anything, whenever I need a piece I just go back into that monster box and pull some out.
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Postby opalis121 on Fri Jul 25, 2014 1:32 pm

Depending on your budget and the size of your work, masterpak makes some really decent prefab art shipping boxes: http://www.masterpak-usa.com/masterpak.htm
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Postby Halo97 on Mon Sep 29, 2014 11:42 am

Very nice peacedog! You turned frame boxing into a work of art in itself!
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Postby dinkydoggy on Mon Sep 29, 2014 12:15 pm

Extremely helpful tips. Thanks guys! :clap:
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Postby fdi1001 on Mon Oct 20, 2014 11:16 am

Great info on this thread about shipping framed prints. We ship thousands a year so I can say what Peacedog showed was excellent. The shipping companies do not like large flat boxes because they have to be moved by hand through the sorting facilities if they are too large for the conveyer systems. The frame needs to have some protective material and distance between it and the outside box on all 6 sides, however the corners are the most important. Assume they will be throwing the box out of the truck and it will hit the floor on the corner. Make sure that the components are all secured and cant move. Usually not an issue for a single frame but we often ship multiple and if they are not secure they will bang together. We do not use peanuts because the frame might work its way through the peanuts and end up against the outside of the box. We like a combination of cardboard/foamboard and bubble as protection. Double wall cardboard especially around the edges are a plus. Uline has the best selection of regular flat shipping boxes. Making your own box is something to consider since the larger the box the more your cost for shipping. This use to be real true for boxes larger than 3 cubic feet due to the shipping companies charging what they call dimensional weight. At the beginning of the year all box sizes are eligible for dimensional weight charges via Fedex and UPS. This is forcing my company to go more with custom boxes and I plan to start selling boxes just for shipping picture frames. Make sure you insure your shipment appropriately. When shipping artwork you may need to go with 3rd party insurance since Fedex and UPS may have limits on that. There is no such thing as bullet proof. The only reason peacedog has not had trouble is because he does not ship enough. Although his packing is great, it will not hold up to a forklift fork going through the box or being run over by a truck (we have seen both).
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Postby canuck on Mon May 08, 2017 8:50 pm

About to ship off a framed print. Very helpful thread.

Bump.
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Postby peacedog on Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:12 am

Reposting this since photobucket blocked my pics.



We've gotten a lot of compliments on our boxing method when we ship, I thought I'd share it here. Similar to Scratch's method but with a few refinements.

The framed piece is first wrapped face down in microfoam wrap. We fold the ends under in opposing directions to create an extra padding on both corners. Label the top/front for orientation as you're wrapping it.
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We measure the piece, add about 3/8" in both directions. Cut three pieces of corrugated cardboard to this size, one piece for the bottom, two for the top with the flutes of the corrugation running in opposite directions. Layering the opposing corrugation increases the durability to protect the face.
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Cut two pieces of cardboard the length of the long side of your box and about 5" wide with the corrugation running the length. Crease the pieces and tape them into place. Repeat for the short sides slipping the first tab behind the print, then the front side in between the double layer of cardboard facing. By doing so you create a locked corner that can't collapse on itself. Tape the corners for a bit of extra reinforcement. Again, keep track of the front/top of your framed piece.
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If we're using a private currier (someone who knows what they're handling) instead of UPS, this is the stopping point, we refer to it as an inner box. For UPS we continue on...

For the inset of the outer box, cut a piece of cardboard, allowing for 2" on both sides, as well as in front and back of the inner box. So an inner box size10"x20"x2" would require a piece of cardboard 26"x36" for it's outer box.
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Mark 6' in on all sides.
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Notch out the cardboard against the corrugation (this is important later).
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Using a straight edge, crease the cardboard along your marked lines. Creasing cardboard against the grain is no fun an will beat on your hands. We find using a thin poster tube sliced longways and slipped over a straight edge helps provide a grip.
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Fold the tabs inwards and tape the corners.
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Measure the inside of the box and cut a piece of cardboard with the flutes running the opposite direction to fit it into the bottom for additional reinforcement.
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Repeat the same steps for the lid with a piece of cardboard 1" larger in both directions and the corrugation running the opposite direction as the inset box. Finish two sides measuring in 1/4" more than the inset box. Mark the two remaining sides to fit the bottom half and finish the top. Finish with another piece of cardboard (alternating flute direction, always alternating...) to fit snugly in the lid as you di with the inset box.
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If you've alternated your corrugation, when the lid is snugged onto the inset box the folded corners are on both sides of the corner, the flutes running the width of the box providing crush protection and making for a very sturdy corner.
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Three layers of 1" bubble wrap in the bottom of the box.
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Center in the inner box.
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We then use rolls the small 1/4" bubble wrap to fit the channel around the inner box.
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Top off with more layers of 1" bubble wrap on top. Don't forget to check your orientation of front/top before you close the box.
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Snug the lid on, tape it shut, first strap tape across from front to back, then lengthwise along the seams.
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Affix "Fragile" stickers to all sides. We always align the stickers tags to reflect the orientation of the print inside the box, both front and back. As well additional "this side up" stickers help keep your art facing the right direction while in transit (hopefully).
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Off to the shipper, insure appropriately.

We've never had a problem with this method. I'm a strong believer in the alternating corrugation to increase the strength of the corners and faces of the box. It's much more difficult for a box to develop a crease or bend with this method. We obviously have a lot of tools on hand that make this easier to do for us, it still takes a solid 30-45 minutes if I'm moving quick on an average sized box. We have a lot of cardboard and bubble wrap to recycle from incoming supplies which is helpful, but we still have to buy larger sheets of cardboard for most boxes.

I much prefer bubble wrap to packing peanuts. It stays where you put it, it isn't a complete mess to deal with, and most peanuts are not environmentally friendly.

Foamcore will crease unpredictably in any direction under stress as well as it punctures easily, I would not recommend it ever as a packing material.

I hope you find this info helpful. :cheers:
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Postby fdi1001 on Wed Apr 18, 2018 10:37 am

Wow Peacedog that is definitely some great packing. Double boxing with bubble in between is great, although not sure the purpose of the microfoam unless you did not have it in a bag and wanted to protect it from the cardboard. Making a custom box is more expensive and time consuming, however there are two great advantages. One is that it ensures you have enough protection on all sides, but you dont have extra space in the box. The extra space in the box requires void fill (more bubble or something) and it will increase the shipping cost due to dim weight charges. Most damage happens on the corners, so if you wanted to save money on over size fees I would suggest going a little thinner with a 3 or 4 inch thick box instead of what looks like 5 or 6 inches. Although we have found you certainly need a good 2-3 inches of protection around the edges, 1-2 is usually fine for the front and back.

I would add that even thought this is great packing and the chance of damage is low, it will not be zero even if you build a crate. Sometimes they will just drive a forklift through your box so always be sure to get the insurance. If it is expensive art you may need to get 3rd party insurance.
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Postby peacedog on Wed Apr 18, 2018 1:02 pm

Second time you've mentioned it, if you need to let out the forklift story I want you to know I'm here to lend an ear. So far our shipping track record is near perfect as far away as Australia, pretty pleased with our methods.
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