Shipping framed prints

Information on shipping, storing and repairing your art, plus your reviews on products for art collecting, making, storing, etc..

Postby robertozanzi on Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:25 pm

Can anyone provide some general info about the do's and don't of shipping framed prints? Or if there is already a faq, can somebody please lead me in that direction?

I am clueless as to how much it costs, packing, insurance,etc.

Any help is greatly appreciated as always!
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Postby halftonegraphics on Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:35 pm

Bring it to UPS and let them do it. If anything goes wrong, they are automatically at fault.

Otherwise, If you do it yourself, here's a few things I always do..

Cut a couple piece of cardboard to fit in the viewing area of the frame. Wrap frame, with cardboard pieces in place, with bubble wrap. Place in box that gives approximately 2" of breathing room around the frame. Fill empty space with packing material. Make sure the frame is snug within the box. You don't want any 'bounce' to it.

$.02.



Also, if you are shipping USPS, you will want to stay under the 108" girth + length measurement. Otherwise, you will have a huge surplus in charges.
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Postby kcn0 on Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:40 pm

FedEx sells some great packaging material for this purpose - I have received many pieces this way.

EDIT: http://www.fedex.com/us/office/services ... plies.html
Last edited by kcn0 on Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Scratch on Tue Feb 19, 2013 3:55 pm

rap in kraft paper.
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double rapped in bubble rap
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foamcore cut a 1/2 in or so beyond frame, both sides
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always end up having to build a custom box, on big stuff build a box of foamcore inside the box. make sure to leave a few inches extra around frame for when shipper kicks your package
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fill with a couple inches of popcorn
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set piece in there
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cover the rest of the way with popcorn
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put the foamcore top on
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then the box top. and rap edge's with another layer of cardboard
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Postby ejg904 on Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:00 pm

wow - nicely done.
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Postby mistersmith on Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:02 pm

The very first thing I do is bag the piece in a soft poly bag, the same ones I store prints in. Keeps dust, scratches, water, whatever the hell else might happen off the print. Then I usually wrap cardboard around the corners to avoid dings, and then wrap all that in too much bubble wrap. Then I find a bigger box, find a piece of cardboard that fits that box, and tape the piece to the center of the cardboard and slide it in, keeping it from moving during shipping, and keeping it away from the edges. Most of the time I just re-use an American Frame box.

halftonegraphics wrote:Bring it to UPS and let them do it. If anything goes wrong, they are automatically at fault.


But stay out of franchised UPS Stores. Those are fudge.

halftonegraphics wrote:Cut a couple piece of cardboard to fit in the viewing area of the frame. Wrap frame, with cardboard pieces in place, with bubble wrap.


You're putting cardboard directly against the piece? That sounds like a recipe for scratches.
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Postby robertozanzi on Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:30 pm

Thank you everyone for your tips and insight!
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Postby canuck on Thu Jan 30, 2014 11:21 pm

Good stuff bump.
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Postby sidewaysscott on Thu Jan 30, 2014 11:24 pm

mistersmith wrote:But stay out of franchised UPS Stores. Those are fudge.



Best advice around.
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Postby peacedog on Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:21 am

We've gotten a lot of compliments on our boxing method when we ship, I thought I'd share it here. Similar to Scratch's method but with a few refinements.

The framed piece is first wrapped face down in microfoam wrap. We fold the ends under in opposing directions to create an extra padding on both corners. Label the top/front for orientation as you're wrapping it.
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We measure the piece, add about 3/8" in both directions. Cut three pieces of corrugated cardboard to this size, one piece for the bottom, two for the top with the flutes of the corrugation running in opposite directions. Layering the opposing corrugation increases the durability to protect the face.
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Cut two pieces of cardboard the length of the long side of your box and about 5" wide with the corrugation running the length. Crease the pieces and tape them into place. Repeat for the short sides slipping the first tab behind the print, then the front side in between the double layer of cardboard facing. By doing so you create a locked corner that can't collapse on itself. Tape the corners for a bit of extra reinforcement. Again, keep track of the front/top of your framed piece.
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If we're using a private currier (someone who knows what they're handling) instead of UPS, this is the stopping point, we refer to it as an inner box. For UPS we continue on...

For the inset of the outer box, cut a piece of cardboard, allowing for 2" on both sides, as well as in front and back of the inner box. So an inner box size10"x20"x2" would require a piece of cardboard 26"x36" for it's outer box.
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Mark 6' in on all sides.
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Notch out the cardboard against the corrugation (this is important later).
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Using a straight edge, crease the cardboard along your marked lines. Creasing cardboard against the grain is no fun an will beat on your hands. We find using a thin poster tube sliced longways and slipped over a straight edge helps provide a grip.
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Fold the tabs inwards and tape the corners.
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Measure the inside of the box and cut a piece of cardboard with the flutes running the opposite direction to fit it into the bottom for additional reinforcement.
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Repeat the same steps for the lid with a piece of cardboard 1" larger in both directions and the corrugation running the opposite direction as the inset box. Finish two sides measuring in 1/4" more than the inset box. Mark the two remaining sides to fit the bottom half and finish the top. Finish with another piece of cardboard (alternating flute direction, always alternating...) to fit snugly in the lid as you di with the inset box.
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If you've alternated your corrugation, when the lid is snugged onto the inset box the folded corners are on both sides of the corner, the flutes running the width of the box providing crush protection and making for a very sturdy corner.
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Three layers of 1" bubble wrap in the bottom of the box.
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Center in the inner box.
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We then use rolls the small 1/4" bubble wrap to fit the channel around the inner box.
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Top off with more layers of 1" bubble wrap on top. Don't forget to check your orientation of front/top before you close the box.
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Snug the lid on, tape it shut, first strap tape across from front to back, then lengthwise along the seams.
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Affix "Fragile" stickers to all sides. We always align the stickers tags to reflect the orientation of the print inside the box, both front and back. As well additional "this side up" stickers help keep your art facing the right direction while in transit (hopefully).
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Off to the shipper, insure appropriately.

We've never had a problem with this method. I'm a strong believer in the alternating corrugation to increase the strength of the corners and faces of the box. It's much more difficult for a box to develop a crease or bend with this method. We obviously have a lot of tools on hand that make this easier to do for us, it still takes a solid 30-45 minutes if I'm moving quick on an average sized box. We have a lot of cardboard and bubble wrap to recycle from incoming supplies which is helpful, but we still have to buy larger sheets of cardboard for most boxes.

I much prefer bubble wrap to packing peanuts as it stays where you put it, as well it isn't a complete mess to deal with.

Foamcore will crease unpredictably in any direction under stress as well as it punctures easily, I would not recommend it ever as a packing material.

I hope you find this info helpful. :cheers:
Last edited by peacedog on Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:31 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby peacedog on Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:29 am

mistersmith wrote:
halftonegraphics wrote:Cut a couple piece of cardboard to fit in the viewing area of the frame. Wrap frame, with cardboard pieces in place, with bubble wrap.


You're putting cardboard directly against the piece? That sounds like a recipe for scratches.


Agreed, wrap first, then cardboard. Bubble wrap can also leave marks on some finishes, a micro foam wrap is preferred. Do not fill the window with additional cardboard, it'd better off with an air gap between the glass and the cardboard to allow for a bit of breathing room. Should it get crushed there is less direct pressure on the glass.
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Postby wottagunn on Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:47 am

Amazing post, peacedog! Clear, easy to follow and on point.
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Postby duckyhoward on Wed Jun 04, 2014 3:54 am

wottagunn wrote:Amazing post, peacedog! Clear, easy to follow and on point.


:iagree:
What he said!
This post is my "learn something today" reference point. Thanks Peacedog. Congrats on the 5 year anniversary too.
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Postby LeeKaye on Wed Jun 04, 2014 5:59 am

I want to get something framed from Peacedog, just so he can package it. :clap:
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Postby peacedog on Wed Jun 04, 2014 9:58 am

LeeKaye wrote:I want to get something framed from Peacedog, just so he can package it. :clap:


That reminds me, for overseas shipping (or for "bulletproof" shipping) we replace the cardboard lining the boxes with thin wooden boards.
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