Entry-level IT job

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Postby whiskaz on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:20 pm

Bikejoh wrote:This is a pretty dumb question, but I've always had it.. what are IT jobs outside of helpdesk troubleshooting like? App or software development jobs, for example.. what's the daily routine? Does your boss give you a problem that needs to be solved and you just do it? How much training is involved? What are you expected to know coming in? I guess it'd probably be in the job description, just curious what the daily routine is like.


Pretty much... problem comes up, I work it. Developing a fix usually takes 5% of the total time. The other 95% is testing/jumping through hoops to get things migrated through the various environments (integration, QA testing, production). It probably depends on where you work though...

I can't really say how much training is involved... I started 15+ years ago as a student with little/no development experience. The company was just starting to transition to Java. No one had a clue what was going on. I was eager to learn (and very good at learning on my own). I had the perfect opportunity to make myself look good. They brought in a ton of training during the transition but in all of my years there, I can't say I've ever really found any class all that useful. I learn more by doing than by listening to someone. Others are probably different.
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Postby Bikejoh on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:22 pm

whiskaz wrote:I learn more by doing than by listening to someone.


Me too, that's the roadblock I'm at with programming. I have the knowledge and ability, just don't know what to DO..
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Postby whiskaz on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:24 pm

What do you mean by do? Like... what to learn?
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Postby Bikejoh on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:26 pm

No, just what to practice. Like how to actually apply what I've learned. It's always been a homework problem or some other assignment, like the text comparison script my boss asked me to work on.

I'm just not very creative and have trouble coming up with problems to give myself.
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Postby whiskaz on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:35 pm

Oh I hear ya. I have the same problem when things get slow at work... especially if I don't want to fall into a rut and just let my skills go to waste. I fiddle around with scripts for my mediacenter, etc... Topcoder used to be a nifty site where you could find problems/code solutions. I haven't checked it out recently but it appears to have changed a bit... But yea, I still enjoy coding, even though I do it professionally, and I'm always trying to find something to do that isn't part of my day job, when my day job gets boring.
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Postby Bikejoh on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:45 pm

Will check out Topcoder, any more problem/code solution resources like that would be greatly appreciated.. really think it would point me in the right direction.

Maybe a textbook? MVA guys always talk about Powershell in a Month of Lunches.
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Postby IWish on Sat Aug 06, 2016 5:58 pm

I googled 'programming projects for resume' and found the following:

These might not be exactly what you're looking for though. Maybe something on the list will give you ideas to build-on. I have the same problem when coding, Bikejoh. As mentioned earlier, I find things to build that can be used for personal use.

https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-goo ... -undergrad

https://github.com/karan/Projects#networking

Networking

FTP Program - A file transfer program which can transfer files back and forth from a remote web sever.

Bandwidth Monitor - A small utility program that tracks how much data you have uploaded and downloaded from the net during the course of your current online session. See if you can find out what periods of the day you use more and less and generate a report or graph that shows it.

Port Scanner - Enter an IP address and a port range where the program will then attempt to find open ports on the given computer by connecting to each of them. On any successful connections mark the port as open.

Mail Checker (POP3 / IMAP) - The user enters various account information include web server and IP, protocol type (POP3 or IMAP) and the application will check for email at a given interval.

Country from IP Lookup - Enter an IP address and find the country that IP is registered in. Optional: Find the Ip automatically.

Whois Search Tool - Enter an IP or host address and have it look it up through whois and return the results to you.

Site Checker with Time Scheduling - An application that attempts to connect to a website or server every so many minutes or a given time and check if it is up. If it is down, it will notify you by email or by posting a notice on screen.
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Postby Baker on Sat Aug 06, 2016 8:09 pm

Our BCP/DR plan for our company is pretty comprehensive, but that is because of our ISO/TL certifications we have. I was responsible for a large chunk of it when I managed the NOC, just having the experience running through those company certifications was good experience.

As far as me personally, I have exactly 0 certifications. Ive just worked my way around in the company I work in, like I said, experience will always outweigh certs. I have gone from NOC (Tier I), Tier II, Tier I lead (Managed 5 people), NOC Manager (Managed 19 people), Back to Tier II, and just got a new somewhat random title within our Tier II group. I have a telecommunications degree and have just strangely had things tie together nicely.

Used to work for AT&T in Nashville primarily on our statewide network installing gear statewide. Then moved to Denver, and my AT&T program manager hooked me up with the vendor they were using for their NG911 ESINET, and started there when we got to Denver. Since then I have worked for the same company for around 5 years. Been through 2 acquisitions now and still here so not all bad. Good luck in everything!
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Postby IWish on Sat Aug 06, 2016 9:24 pm

Bikejoh, how about creating an app with an fillable questionaire to grade/score businesses on the effectiveness of their current BCP/DR plan that is in place. An "audit" of their plan, so to speak. Then print a report that shows strengths/weaknesses. There are templates and other good info on the following link:

http://searchsmbstorage.techtarget.com/ ... -and-guide

:lol: Free feel to ignore me, I'm on a roll now...just throwing ideas out there. Heh.
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If you need weights to flatten posters. Make your own using penny rolls - it's inexpensive. Just throw them into a ziplock or something similar. Non-organic and there is no risk getting an infestation (grain bugs).

Postby Bikejoh on Sat Aug 06, 2016 9:25 pm

Keep em comin! I know nothing about making apps tho. :wink:
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Postby IWish on Sat Aug 06, 2016 9:35 pm

Okay. I gotcha'...I'm going way out into left field with that suggestion. :lol:
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If you need weights to flatten posters. Make your own using penny rolls - it's inexpensive. Just throw them into a ziplock or something similar. Non-organic and there is no risk getting an infestation (grain bugs).

Postby Codeblue on Sun Aug 07, 2016 1:15 am

If ya really wanna code, switch to CS instead of EE for christ sake. And get a drymounting internship coding instead of doing desktop support.
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Postby Bikejoh on Sun Aug 07, 2016 1:18 am

Not EE, Electronic Systems Engineering Technology, about 70/30 hardware/software. Two semesters away from graduating, too late for an internship, not about to switch majors. Senior project is software heavy and should look pretty good.
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Postby LeeKaye on Sun Aug 07, 2016 2:16 am

Bikejoh wrote:This is a pretty dumb question, but I've always had it.. what are IT jobs outside of helpdesk troubleshooting like?

App or software development jobs, for example.. what's the daily routine? Does your boss give you a problem that needs to be solved and

you just do it? How much training is involved? What are you expected to know coming in? I guess it'd probably be in the job

description, just curious what the daily routine is like.



I work on a software product that is developed in the US but installed globally. The exact code is just configured differently for each country/region (i.e. language settings features etc.). The regions like mine often have specific requirements or features that the US are too busy to do. For example the software takes payment from people, and the systems over here are different, so I specialise in that.

What I will do is this. Speak to the regional engineers and find out what they want. Go back and forth and write down exactly what it is, i.e. functional requirements. Then I estimate how long it will take and who would use it. Sometimes the feature is key to win a tender. All this information is fed up to the business who decide if it's worth adding or not.

If it is, then I start adding the code in. When finished, I will document it, and where applicable train the engineers or sales staff on how it works, who will then train other people. When it gets released the engineers support the basic stuff and others get fed back to me. Sometimes I go to the site and train the end users and install as well.

So in a day I could be 75% coding, 10% looking into bugs that get assigned to me and 15% just talking about future work. The general plan is decided among the team.

As for the job requirements, they were a rather generic. Must know C#, be able to work in a team, good communication skills (they all say this) etc. etc.

I don't want to 'just' code forever, as I love the other stuff like training and customer interaction...and I am good at it too. Many codemonkeys shouldn't be let out of the basement.

(PS I still owe you a PM, haven't forgotten about that)
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Postby jmagee87 on Sun Aug 07, 2016 7:25 am

A developer with exceptional people skills? You sir are a unicorn
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